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retrodirect/glowbike

Member since Oct 2014 • Last active Jun 2020
  • 12 conversations
  • 80 comments

Most recent activity

  • in Frame Builders
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    I was totally unaware of these ideas2cycles jig parts. I was about to spend a load of time lathing stuff up. That's a bargain for what it is. (I'm a rubbish lathe operator). Just ordering now.

  • in Bikes & Bits
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    @gillies

    I've ridden most of the big common cargo-bikes for work at various points, though the one I'm still keen to try out is a reise and muller.

    BULLIT I'm sure I'm probably going to repeat what others have said on here. There's a reason that all of the delivery companies exclusively use Bullit's. They're big, solid reliable and handle well. As a wee note: there was a geometry change when they moved to the ones with the integrated headtubes out front. The old ones ride nicely, but the newer ones ride even better. The steering feels much more neutral at slow speed tight turns. The older ones started to kick and jackknife the front wheel in really tight slow turns.

    8-freights handling remarkably doesn't change when going from loaded to unloaded. It really surprised me, I think it's the straight fork and low wheelflop. Unfortunately, it goes from riding like ass with a really really vague steering feel to riding like ass with a really vague steering feel. I'm sure it's something you could get used to, but unless you have a massive hardon for mike burrows you're probably best to get something else.

    Urban Arrow. AVOID! The riding position is so reclined that you can't get any power into the pedals. This means you're relying on the motor all of the time and essentially using your pedalling as a throttle. If that motor ever cuts out you're stuffed. They're also super heavy, super expensive and universally hated by all of th ebike mechanics who have to suffer servicing the things.

    Omniums. The cargo and minimax are super super rad. Probably the best cross between a cargobike and a standard bike out there. Probably not suitable for transporting two children and shopping however. The only downside is the same downside as all other cargobikes, which is the size of them.

    Christiania. AVOID! rode down the arthurs seat road (steep long road in edinburgh) with cars passing super close, trying to slow down but every time I did the bike would violently try to swing into the kerb. The twin front disc brakes (one on each wheel) are a pig to balance and always end up with one brake being the only one operating. They're also hell when you hit any sort of rough surface.

    The absolute worst cargobike I have ever ridden is an MSC Truck it seems like someone had commissioned a bunch without ever having ridden the thing. It wouldn't go aroudn a corner, when it was loaded up the flex along the length of the bike was extreme, you would start turning a corner and there would be a lag as the weight behind you twisted the whole bike. The bike would hit it's max twist as you hit the apex. Hideous hideous thing! Thank god we offloaded that dross to Edinburgh. ;)

    I've also ridden a bunch of modified pedicabs, trikes, cycletrucks etc. but none of these are suitable.

  • in Bikes & Bits
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    This bike is tiny!
    https://www.instagram.com/colin_woof/ for photos of it being welded together

  • in Frame Builders
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    you're ma fav.

  • in Frame Builders
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    pew pew pew pew

  • in Frame Builders
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    1. Bicycling science is the bible.
    2. The Mike Burrows book is more popular science so probably a little surface level for someone with an engineering background.
    3. As a lesser known choice, I really rate "Lords of the
      chainring", it's part of the CalPoly Masters Aeronautical
      engineering course. You can get it from the authors website, (Bill
      patterson?).

      It's looking at the dynamics of two wheeled vehicles in terms of
      steering moment and rider intention. Like the way aeroplanes control
      systems are designed (I believe).

      It has it's flaws, like it doesn't have the derivations of the math
      involved and it's wierdly laid out as it's the coursebook for the Uni. But the Uni are pretty helpful if you need help and get in touch, they certianly were for me, and sent me a bunch of spreadsheets and useful bits.

      It's good for getting away from all the "high trail makes a bike
      steer slow, low trail makes a bike steer fast" confusing dross that
      seems to permeate the bike-design literature.

  • in Edinburgh
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    I've just sent him a message for you sending him here. x

  • in Edinburgh
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    Andy Laing? aka adventure Andy?

    If yes, he's living up north on the black isle nowadays. Can still be found at singlespeed mountainbike events. He's not in Edinburgh very much though.

    Edit: It turns out this website tells me when folk are talking about me :)

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