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MrE

Member since Apr 2012 • Last active Feb 2019
  • 1 conversations
  • 648 comments

10 years coal mining, 25 years teaching, 10 years Head of Faculty, now retired...

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    Console yourself with the graph half way down this: https://www.thegreenage.co.uk/what-is-th­e-recommended-thickness-of-loft-insulati­on/ and then improve things by adding the insulating properties of your boards?

    Our loft space has 150mm insulation and boards over the joists - a neighbour (identical house) has something like 300mm and very similar heating bills but without the extra storage space...

  • in Mechanics & Fixin'
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    Not rattlecan and therefore defeating the purpose of the thread, but I've repainted a frame using Halfords enamel and a decent brush - no overspray, can be done indoors, no problems with paint incompatibility, no issues with water condensing in the spray, and two coats gave enough thickness of paint to sand out runs and still cut back to a gloss finish. Obviously no good if you want anything other than a solid single colour, but it's still looking good after a couple of years.
    https://www.lfgss.com/conversations/3070­91/ FWIW

  • in Miscellaneous and Meaningless
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    We had a similar problem - pools of condensation, mainly in the length of flexible duct that was lying flat on the loft insulation, eventually overflowing and dribbling back down the vent.

    My 'insulating' was done with many layers of plant fleece and duct tape - supposedly temporary until I replaced the corrugated duct with something smooth walled and properly fitted, but that was five winters ago and I still haven't done it.

    I also removed some of the excess flexible duct, giving a better flow rate and a smaller area for heat transfer and subsequent condensation - there was around 3m of duct in place when only 2m was actually needed.

    Increasing the run time of the fan helps: there is always going to be some condensation until the inside of the duct warms up above the dew point - this condensation can only be removed by running back down the duct or evaporating into air that has a relatively low humidity.

    Now my problem is that the current bodge seems to work well enough, so there's no real motivation to go back into the loft to do it properly...

  • in Miscellaneous and Meaningless
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    I've got 27x1 1/4 wheels in a frame intended for (I think) some sort of 700C. Clearance with a Michelin World Tour at 75psi is around 2mm at the caliper and grit very occasionally gets into the gap - exciting noises and some definite braking effects as it gets dragged through, but no locking up yet - I'm guessing the size of grit or road dressing that might lock the wheel is either too large to be carried in the tread or it gets knocked off by the caliper.

    The 'inside' of my rear caliper looks a bit hard used, but in terms of safety it's probably less of a problem that the fag paper clearances found at some fork crowns? Possibly use mudguard clearances as a guide if it worries you?

    Alternatively, try reading this by way of reassurance:
    https://www.lfgss.com/conversations/2887­96/

  • in Bikes & Bits
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    I have an uncomfortable and vivid recollection of crack detection in winding gear castings - wiping parts with a dye and blowing french chalk over it. This was an annual event, sufficiently labour intensive to be a job for apprentices* under the arms-length supervision of the colliery engineer.

    In theory, dye will be drawn into a surface crack on a clean surface, which would then show up as a stain in the subsequent dusting of chalk. In practice everyone (except the engineer) spent the next week or so with red stained hands, and we never actually found any cracks.

    You might be able to apply this method to a frame - it might identify surface cracks in places you can see, it would require some savage cleaning afterwards, and it has all the makings of a good spectator event. Photos if you try it please.

    *I was a NCB apprentice in the 1970s...

  • in Miscellaneous and Meaningless
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    If my memory serves correctly, it was originally 110mm OLN and I set it to something around 125mm with a 5mm axle spacer NDS and 10mm on the drive side - including the NDS spacer was an attempt to avoid excessive dishing. I know I tried different approaches - before setting the frame I removed the smallest sprocket, and although the next (4th) sprocket didn't foul the stays, the chain did.
    I could be wrong about the sizes - it was around five years ago and I've slept since then. Can you lay hands on the 6 speed from Decathlon and measure their hub?

  • in Miscellaneous and Meaningless
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    I suspect a freewheel (6 or 7) will fit the hub but there could well be frame clearance issues.

    When I converted a BMX to 1x5 (then 2x5, finally 3x5) it involved an axle spacer, dishing the wheel and cold setting the frame to prevent the chain catching the seat stay when in 'top' gear.

  • in Miscellaneous and Meaningless
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    A pictorial approach using Corel Draw: the yellow circle is a 100mm reference with no allowance for foreshortening, red circle is an average of outer and inner perimeters of the bolt holes (line thickness was later increased to make it visible in the photo)
    Most of the error is due to the camera having a relatively short focal length, but measuring your photo and scaling gives a BCD of 143.7mm - say 144mm with an error in measurement of 0.2%, which is probably as accurate as you'll get with a tape measure.

  • in Bikes & Bits
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    My mistake - and your English is significantly better than my German.

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