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Ndeipi

Member since Apr 2011 • Last active Feb 2023

Most recent activity

  • in Wanted Adverts
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    Thanks for the offer. I'll probably pass on that because I'm looking for a pair and I can't see a left veloce ergo in black on eBay. I'm also looking for silver, ideally.

  • in Wanted Adverts
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    Anyone have a pair of ergo levers that don't shift? I might buy them!

    I'm intending to strip out gear mechanism and use as single speed brake levers.

  • in Current Projects
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    I have a SRAM Red 10 speed cassette if you're interested. Verrrry light.

  • in Classifieds
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    Attention grabbing price so they can receive offer by phone, I reckon.

  • in Mechanics & Fixin'
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    It's lateral symmetry/alignment which is the challenge. As @TooTallTim says using a known true wheel will help. If you have a hole in the bottom of your fork crown and can source the exact right diameter tube to slot into it then you create a third, central leg to compare the two fork legs against. I did this on my tandem forks.

  • in Current Projects
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    Personally I would buy a bar that takes aero-bars. But I can see your approach working.

    If you do go the DIY route I think you should stress-test whatever you make. Yank hard on the aero-bars. Repeatedly. And bang them with a rubber mallet to simulate potholes. I can see this failing catastrophically (if at all) so it's better to see that happen in your garden rather than on the road.

    Alternatively, could there be a way to fix something between the two shifters? It would be sweet if a company made alternative shifter bar clamps (you know, the silver loops) which could then take attachments sideways. You could then mount a piece of bar between the shifter clamps and clamp aerobars to the new piece of bar.

    You could achieve this with Problem Solver bar clamps just below each shifter like this but I don't know if it would interfere with hand placement.

    You could use a carbon tube with same ID/OD as fork steerer, and then use a steerer expansion bung in each end. The bolts would then go cleanly from clamp to bung. Handlebar tape over the joins. You also gain another bar to mount lights/Garmin to. I would worry about this bar rotating when you lean on the aerobars though!

    Basically a DIY hover bar:

  • in Mechanics & Fixin'
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    Another vote for big/big method that snotty mentioned last page, specifically:

    The correct way is big/big not through the derailleur plus a pair of links on top of the shortest you could make it, from there you usually add another pair for 1x and another for suspension.

    I worked with a very skilled race mechanic who told me this was the standard Shimano method. Also happens to be the Sheldon Brown method IIRC.

  • in Mechanics & Fixin'
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    From that OneUp guide link:

    Boost 148 was created to give frame makers more design freedom for tire and front derailleur clearance. From a drivetrain perspective it moves the cassette 3mm away from the frame centerline. The new ideal chainline for Boost bikes is 51-53mm.

    To increase the chainline by 3 mm you should buy a BB with spindle 6 mm longer than before. 110 mm before means 116 mm now.

    As you have said, the only way to be sure would be to remount the BB onto the old frame, tighten down the crank again and measure chainline. It's a 10 minute exercise including removing everything again. You don't even need to put the left BB cup in. If you find 49 mm then you know you need 52mm chanline for the new bike.

    Note: The 68 mm vs 73 mm shell width doesn't make a difference to chainline, only the length of the BB spindle matters.

  • in Components and clothing
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    I'm looking for a sturrrdy wheel box. I'm in Hackney/Tottenham.

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