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gbj_tester

Member since Nov 2009 • Last active Oct 2021

Supplier of round objects to the forum

https://grafixbyjorj.co.uk/

Most recent activity

  • in Miscellaneous and Meaningless
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    would it work the other way around, a 1 1/2 fork in a 1 1/8 headtube

    No, of course not. 1..5" is 38mm, a normal 1⅛" EC lower cup goes into a 34mm ID head tube. If you have a 44mm ID head tube and an IS44 headset for a 1⅛" fork, you can use an EC44/40 lower and accept the extra 12-14mm added to your effective fork length, but I'm guessing that if you had that you wouldn't even be asking.

  • in Miscellaneous and Meaningless
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    does the 3.1A represent the maximum available that could be drawn?

    Yes

  • in Miscellaneous and Meaningless
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    Afaik it has to be an external 1 1/2” headset lower in a 44mm headtube

    If you're putting a 1⅛" fork into a 44mm head tube, you can of course use a ZS44/30 lower, but you have to accommodate (or tolerate) the change in geometry.

  • in Miscellaneous and Meaningless
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    i see "IPv4 address" with 192.168.etc etc

    That's your IP address on your LAN. If that's all you need to know, you're done. If you need to know where the rest of the world thinks you are, you need to look on your internet router to see what the external IP address is*

    *or JFGI, google result for "what's my IP" will return the external address of your router

  • in Miscellaneous and Meaningless
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    is my IPv4 address equivalent to my IP address?

    It's the IP address you'd recognise if you've been at this for a while, a 32 bit number usually written as four 8-bit numbers converted to decimal and separated by dots e.g. 128.1.1.0
    You might simultaneously have a 128-bit IPv6 address for the same node

  • in Miscellaneous and Meaningless
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    So the submission was a good thing?

    It's a normal part of assembling practical components. Things must bend in order to generate the forces which stop them drifting off into space. What you did is not outside the ordinary limits of how far things have to bend to go together.

  • in Miscellaneous and Meaningless
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    Are they too big for the stem?

    They were until you squished them into submission 🙂

    The process of drawing and swaging aluminium into the shape of a handlebar is not a high precision operation, there's a pretty big (by modern machining standards) tolerance on dimensions and roundness. The radial gap you see in Fig.3 will be about 0.9mm if the bar diameter is just 50Ξm larger than the bore diameter of the stem. Fortunately, everything is made of rubber and will happily bend enough to make the bar and the bore contact one another around the full circumference once you apply the fastener load.

  • in Miscellaneous and Meaningless
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    Vickers VC 10

    More like a VC11 since the IL-62 is about 10% bigger 🙂

    My closest encounter with the VC10 was making the mistake of riding under the final approach at Benson just after an RAF one landed, getting drenched in the fog of unburnt fuel they left trailing in their wake.

  • in Miscellaneous and Meaningless
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    not normal people

    I resemble that remark!

  • in Miscellaneous and Meaningless
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    I know the two things are different, but for the home user why would they get involved in the hackery of virtualisation on local hardware when they can do everything they want via an arbitrary web browser interface to a VM run by professionals in some data shed in Slough? Normal people don't even know which browser they're using, they just open Google on whichever screen is in front of them. They certainly have no concept of or interest in the resource allocation and security implications of containerising different users or applications.

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