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clubman

Member since Jun 2008 • Last active Nov 2019

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  • in General
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    I'm rather expecting that lap top is going to turn up soon.......

    "I just thought I'd give those cushions on the settee a bit of a tidy up, and what d'you know, there it was down the back of the sofa!"

  • in Bikes & Bits
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    Assuming your block is like all the others I've seen:

    There should be a disc just outside the damaged slots which the removing tool would have fitted into. The disc is often stamped "unscrew" with an arrow pointing clockwise since it normally has a lefthand thread. This disc is the outer cone of the freewheel bearing and should have two small holes into which you can insert a punch or the edge of a chisel to unscrew the disc. Once this is off the outer part of the block with the sprockets comes away revealing the centre which can be removed in a vice.

    And if you can re-assemble it afterwards you're a cleverer person than I am.

  • in Bikes & Bits
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    I happen to have a spare block (if I can find it, that is) 16, 19,22. If you can repair or replace the mech you can have it.
    Remove the old block by dismantling it and then unscrewing the centre holding it in a bench vice. Do not cut the spokes to remove the damaged rim before doing this!

    Personally, I would want to convert this machine to 5 speed, since I think a 3 speed derailleur is more touble than it's worth, unless you can use a wide ratio double chain ring set up. The TdF will not cope with this.

  • in Bikes & Bits
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    This was an all too well known failure back in the day.

    It was usually caused by the arm of the mecahism getting bent (often by someone other than the owner!), but faulty adjustment was certainly another cause. Benelux and Huret were just as bad, and this problem was perhaps the main thing which made the Campag Gran Sport such a revelation. With a Campag, if someone knocked your bike over it would only push the mech over against the spring - as soon as you picked it up it just sprang back to where it was before with no harm done.

    In this case, I note that the block is very close to the hub flange, which meant there was no margin of error to avoid this disaster - a spacer (or two) behind that block might have secured a longer life for the unfortunate TdF mech.

  • in Bikes & Bits
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    It's not obvious from the photo, but on the Aussie Hurlen the back mudguard lower stays are made up from wire coat hangers - with the mounting on the seat stay in that position you need very long stays and I couldn't find any. My effort is not quite as good as the originals since the wire is slightly thinner and less rigid, but they've kept the mudguard in place for some years now.

  • in Bikes & Bits
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    You could be right about those lugs - I don't know what they are, but the bottom bracket is standard size, so that's not much help for indentification.

    Sealing your BB bearing might be ok for the bearing, but it's not a solution for the problem - perhaps your LBS is hoping to sell you a new frame after yours has rusted through!

    I think this problem is almost always caused by lack of a back mudguard, but you might take the extra precaution of silicon sealer around the seat bolt area.

    It used to be normal practice (towards the end of the unsealed BB era in the 70's and 80's) to fit a plastic seal between the BB cups. You may still be able to find these at cycle jumbles, but if not it's possible to make one from a plastic bottle.

  • in Bikes & Bits
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    Aussie Hurlen Frame

    I've no reason to think the lugs are Chater Lea. When I referred to the 'bottom bearing' I meant the bottom of the headset, not the bottom bracket.

    The oversize bottom headset bearing was a fairly common feature pre 1939. I think most Selbachs had one, as did Sunbeams. I don't know who made them, and I've got a feeling that Sunbeam made their own. It certainly seems a good idea since it is always the bottom end of a headset which gets damaged, so beefing it up ought to help.

    Mudguards

    Riding without mudguards can often cause water to get into the seat tube and from there it may well ruin the BB bearing or, worse still, sit in the tube until it rusts through.

    Possible remedies include:

    • sealing the bearing and drilling the underside of the BB shell to allow the water to get out.
    • sealing the top of the seat tube, especially where the seat pin clamp has become distorted.
    • buying a new frame!
      -fitting a back mudguard.

  • in Bikes & Bits
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    Jonny69's method should work fine (as with all his techniques) . You might try some penetrating oil and heat as well if you're not confident.

    It's important that the blow with the hammer should be straight on, not an angle, which will bend the threaded part of the pin.

    As for hating cotter pins, I can honestly say that in recent years I've had to deal with far more problems relating to square taper cranks than with cotter pins.These have been mostly relatives and friends who have failed to notice slight movement on their cotterless crank and only asked me about it after causing irrepairable damage. Even if a cotter pin does come loose, it's usually only the pin itself that suffers, and this is easy to replace.

  • in Bikes & Bits
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    I'm amused to see that the rear fork end on this Cinelli is almost exactly the same as the TT frame I used for all my PB's.

    My frame was originally badged as a Dayton, although I suspect it wasn't made by them at Park Royal. It was a track frame which had a damaged rear fork end and in 1978 I asked Dave Russell to convert it for geared TT use - he said it would be difficult to change to road ends, so he fitted new forged track ends and brazed on a campag gear hanger.

    This arrangement worked perfectly and served me well until the introduction of the new 'clip on' bar position in 1991.

  • in Bikes & Bits
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    Another view:

    I thought you might like to see this machine. The kit is eclectic, but I hope you can see some distinctly old components among the more modern bits like the saddle and the concealed brake cables.

    An observant observer will have noticed the number '4' on the Sturmey trigger - the hub is an FM which gives a 33% decrease from direct drive. I find this very useful since the area is hilly.
    Gearing is 48 x 18 which gives just under 71" direct and a bottom of 49".

    Front hub is an Airlite QR which I bought new in 1977. The shopkeeper didn't know what to charge for it, so he looked up the price in the latest British Hub Co. catalogue he had. This dated from 1962, so the price seemed reasonable!

    The frame is believed to be an Aussie Hurlen, a Liverpool builder and I'm fairly sure it is pre-war. It has round fork blades and what look like hand cut lugs. As can be seen, the clearances are close with 700 rims (the brake stirrups are Weinmann 500's), so it was either intended for 26's or for racing. The headset is a headclip type and the bottom bearing has larger than standard balls ( I think they are 1/4") which was not uncommon on quality frames in the 1930's. The seat tube is 20" which has shown me the limit of my personal move to smaller frames - this is the absolute minimum I can manage.

    When I first got this frame I intended to use it with fixed, but for some reason I never felt at ease with it in that form, whereas with the Sturmey it makes a comfortable and useful machine.

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