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stevo_com

Member since Jan 2008 • Last active Apr 2021

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  • in Miscellaneous and Meaningless
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    The problems are a few fold.

    One is the whole toddler cliff diving conundrum.

    There are also some plants/shrubbery items/ivy type deals that need to be removed as they are currently sliding into the brook and have also grown over the brook and are hanging over the railings into the park. They need to go, which will destabilise the ground further.

    Losing those plants, creates a massive gap so I then need to reclaim some privacy.

    I'll already be giving up two or three feet with where the fence will go (the tiny violins are deafening). Anymore and it will encroach on shed space, compost, random wildening of the end of the garden etc etc.

    Even if I did just put up a fence further in and leave the retaining wall for later, I reckon quite a bit of earth would make its way into the brook before it got resolved. This could then compromise my neighbours fence. So I'd rather do something now that is good enough, but not janky.

    This isn't a 3m² garden in Islington you need to eek every bit of space possible out of.

    True. But the previous owners took that to the extreme and when they left that's about all there was that was useable. I'm hugely privileged to have this place, any wastage would feel criminal if I could avoid it.

  • in Miscellaneous and Meaningless
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    I'd want to sink the posts 2ft and have at least 2ft above ground, so would need 8ft posts. Which then start to lose their own logistical problems with delivery, getting them round the back of my house etc before I cut them down. The difference in price between 7 X 5' posts and 4 X 8' posts is an ok compromise for the convenience of not having to cut.

    I hate suggesting the wrong fix

    Fully appreciate that this is not what you would recommend or do.

    be generous with the concrete around the posts.

    I will. But they'll also be butting up against the concrete wall of the culvert on one side so they'd have to be levered up and out of the ground by the backfill rather than just being sink into soil all around.

  • in Miscellaneous and Meaningless
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    Current thinking is now full length boards but with posts at half spacing (7 instead of 4) with the boards on the backfilled side of the posts instead of slotted into channels.

  • in Miscellaneous and Meaningless
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    Thanks again for the input. I had read a few random posts from other forums taking about paving slabs on end. Seeing as I've broken those before just by standing on them, that was out. One of the collapsed fences here is chicken wire and (now) rotten battens. Just pulling that out with the tangled ivy means that couldn't be further from an option.

  • in Miscellaneous and Meaningless
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    Halving the space between posts is not a bad shout. Just means three extra posts (and holes) but I was worried about the 6ft span of the gravel board.

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    I've never rendered anything in my life. I don't fancy my chances of making it look good while standing on the other side leaning over the top.

  • in Miscellaneous and Meaningless
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    Plenty of snow in CR7 this morning, sun splitting the trees now.

  • in Miscellaneous and Meaningless
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    I would listen to whatever Colin says first as he does this shit for a living

    I certainly am doing, and I really appreciate the benefit of his experience.

    For the garden fence, concrete posts have been vetoed from a "how it looks from our own garden" perspective. So going with wooden posts; pressure treated, 8ft long, 4"x4" sunk in 2ft with post savers to help against ground rot and a few coats of wood preserver. Not permanent, obviously. But we don't know if we'll be here in 15 years' time and Hopefully the above precautions will mean it lasts longer than the untreated stakes of the fence you can see collapsed in one of the above photos. That is about 30 years old. Once I sort the retaining wall, the ground will (hopefully) be more stable and because the area is fairly sheltered it won't be exposed to gales or the like. It doesn't really even need to be secure as there are many other gardens with little to no barrier between them and the park except for the 8-10ft wide moat/open culvert, so the chances of people just coming across the gardens makes a secure back fence pointless. It will be more of a fairly robust privacy screen for when people are walking past.

    For the retaining wall, I totally accept that what Colin outlines would be the ideal solution (thanks again for taking the time to demonstrate and estimate materials/cost). But my problem is I don't really have any budget for garden works, it is all going on the house (I'm shredding the mountains of cleared shit and drip feeding it through the Croydon garden waste collection to save the cost of someone just taking it all away at once, which I would MUCH prefer to do). I imagine the tricky access might also push up the labour costs if I were to bring someone in. And if I were to try and do it myself, it would absolutely look like a dog's dinner from the park side.

    Would the posts and boards be less than useless, given it's not much more than £200 for materials? Again, if I were to show pictures of how it looked before I started clearing or what others nearby have done, it absolutely can't be the bare minimum solution.

  • in Miscellaneous and Meaningless
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    As it won't be seen above soil level it doesn't have to be pretty

    It will from the park, and it's on our "go the fuck to sleep" walk with mini_com so we'd see it most days she's not in childcare.

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