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Greasy_Paws

Member since Jun 2007 • Last active Sep 2021
  • 20 conversations
  • 611 comments

Most recent activity

  • in Bikes & Bits
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    The Pletscher twin leg kick stand has marks to cut the legs to required length according to wheelsize or personal preferences. No thumb rule here as the OD of wheel depends on tyre size so better do an initial cut, mount the kickstand again on the bike and check (on a flat surface) how much the front wheel lifts from the ground. If still too much, then proceed to repeat the process until you get to the required height. Metal saw would suffice to cut the aluminium legs (round the edges of cut legs with a file). Use the plastic end caps for this twin model which (surprisingly) are not included with the kickstand.

    As @goosenoose suggests a front stabilizer helps a lot to prevent a flopping front wheel.

    I will say leave no more than 5cm from front wheel to the ground as it will help to keep bike stable when you are on an uneven surface (mostly all the time) and you will have a good chance of both wheels touching the ground. But as I said is a matter of personal preferences.

  • in Mechanics & Fixin'
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    I carry the topeak super chain tool with an additional quicklink on a small tool pocket on framebag. When purchased, I tested it on an old chain removing and inserting a couple of pins and appared to be solid enough for occassional use. Chain hook also helps to keep everything in place when inserting the pin, although I prefer to use quick link for reattaching .

  • in Mechanics & Fixin'
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    Relatively easy to check whether your wheel is dished correctly without any tool just using a flat surface and two identical mugs or glasses and stacking coins underneath the hub. Check both sides to spot any gap between hub flange nut and the stack of coins.

    From my limited experience when building a front, non-disc wheel with symmetrical hub dimensions and same spoke length at both sides, you only need to do minor adjustements in terms of dishing as long as spoke tension at both sides is fairly equal.

  • in General
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    Done! ;-)

  • in General
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    Pit stop on the Tour de France 1966 // Injured Cyclist Van den Bossche // Jaques Anquetil refreshing on Tour de France 1959.

    While doing a back-up I have come accross these images I scanned few years ago from a collection of the sports magazine Le Miroir des Sports covering Tour de France editions of the 1960s. If you want higher resolution files for your personal use, click on the image and download from my Flickr account. Enjoy!

    Le Miroir des Sports

    Le Miroir des Sports

    Antequil Tour 1959

  • in Bikes & Bits
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    Remove the clamp bolt and prise open the stem with a flat tyre lever.

  • in Bikes & Bits
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    I think Syntace eccentric inserts allow you to align the rear wheel with the frame after welding. They come in o,5mm and 1mm increments and you place them on drive side to get rear wheel perfectly centered on the rear triangle in case there has been some distorsion when welding dropouts. Definitely not chain tensioning.

  • in Mechanics & Fixin'
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    For the rear hub you don't need to remove the sealed bearings, only get the appropriate end cap for your frame rear spacing. You have options for QR, 142mm Thru Axle and Boost (148mm) Thru Axle.

    Novatec has also a similar system with their 4 in 1 hub models that can be adapted to different frame/ fork specs only replacing the end caps.

  • in Mechanics & Fixin'
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    Not possible, I am afraid.

    The front hub can be changed from thru axle to QR but not the other way round.

    Remove the QR cap and measure the inner diameter of the sealed bearing and you can see it's smaller than 12mm so no possibility to slide a thru axle.

    I also found out the hard way and had to rebuild the front wheel.

  • in Frame Builders
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    Good tip. At our workshop we have a smaller lathe without safety hood. In order to operate the lathe we have to use a magnet on a particular spot on the motor side that 'tricks' the safety system as if the original hood were still there in place. If you press start button without the magnet, the lathe doesn't make any noise at all and appears to have no power.

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