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cycleclinic

Member since Sep 2016 • Last active Dec 2018
  • 5 conversations
  • 736 comments

Dad, husband cyclist, wheel builder and bike shop owner/importer.

http://www.thecycleclinic.co.uk
http://www.velodistribution.co.uk

Most recent activity

  • in Mechanics & Fixin'
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    As already said alloy nipples break mainly if the spokes are too short. The spoke needs to come up to the top of the nipple or slightly above. Sapim nipple freeze or the DT equivalent is essential too spoke stop or slow corrosion.

  • in Mechanics & Fixin'
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    As already said alloy nipples break mainly if the spokes are too short. The spoke needs to come up to the top of the nipple or slightly above. Sapim nipple freeze or the DT equivalent is essential too spoke stop or slow corrosion.

  • in Mechanics & Fixin'
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    If t sounds fine to me. That crank bolt is best tightened as tight as you can. You can only do it up so much anyway and that's how tight it's meant to be. too loose and it unwinds and the cranks fall off without the need of a puller.

  • in Mechanics & Fixin'
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    May be the tyre is the cause but the tension should drop evenly. Yes it should be tried but make sure the tension are even. Evening the tensions does not always make the rim round. Sometimes you have make it round the even the tensions out.

  • in Mechanics & Fixin'
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    Not exactly. The loads are high due to the diamter the braking loads act over the hub flange. If you had a symmetrical disc brake hub the situation would be the same. the tension changes on the rotor side is not proportional to the static spoke tension. The tension changes will be dependant on the torque applied just like on a rim brake rear wheel with the exception that unless your chris hoy you cant apply disc brake torque when pedalling.

  • in Mechanics & Fixin'
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    you can make it more complicated but the result still is disc brakes put more load on the the spokes than rim brakes do on average. The exact ammount will depend on a number of factors but it is wrong to assume they don't.

  • in Mechanics & Fixin'
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    the retartadation rate in the toque part. Torque = moment of roation inertia x angluar aceleration. So it is in there. the higher the retardation rate the higer the torque applied

  • in Mechanics & Fixin'
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    The kinetic energy removed maybe the same but due to the rotor size difference between a rim and the disc brake rotor the forces on the spokes are quite different. The higher forces on the spokes applied at the hub flange (set by the hub flange diameter to rim diameter) do not mean higher retardation force on the bike. I have corrected my first post on this. There is a glaring error.

    As I have shown torque = force applied * diameter of rotor.

    Energy in one revolution is actually work done=torque*2*pi

    Assuming tangential spokes
    So W.D = (braking torque)2pi = force(rotor diameter). That could be rim or brake.

    The work done here is fixed. The rotor diameter is not. It's 10 times larger for the rim than the hub flange pcd ( assuming 62mm Shimano 6 bolt flanges) so the force on the spokes has to becl different. Small disc brake hubs just make matters worse.

    So bringing energy into this changes nothing.

    So when you apply physics/naths the answer falls out. I used to teach this subject and maths too.

    The problem is you are misunderstanding the relationship between torque and energy.

  • in Current Projects
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    Campag 10 speed ergos work with an 7 speed Shimano cassette if you use an Shimano rd. With a campag rd you can only use a 10 speed casstte from campagnolo or miche. Miche make a 13-30t.

    Just saying.
    https://www.google.co.uk/amp/s/jefaisduv­elo.wordpress.com/2013/04/13/shimergo-co­nversion-campagnolo-veloce-10-spd-powers­hift-ergos/amp/

  • in Mechanics & Fixin'
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    Disc brakes do place more braking loads on spokes than rim brakes can. You can work out what the difference is by taking the ratio of the rim diameter to the rotor diameter.

    Force(rim) x d(rim) =force(rotor) *d(rotor)

    So for a 160mm rotor a disc brake thd braking torque goes through the hub fglsnge. Braking forces on spokes are therefore 10 times as much load on the spokes as a rim brake can at the limit of tyre adhesion.

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