• Hi all

    Just need some advice....I am currently building a fixed gear track bike (first time!) and have ordered a new sealed threaded square taper bottom bracket. (68x107mm)... so I was wondering whether you add grease OR anti-seize to the bottom bracket shell? OR I have heard that some people put grease on the drive side and anti-seize on the non-drive side?

    Additional question is that you always install the drive side first....why is this? OR does is not really matter?

    THANKS and it'll be good to hear how you all set up your own bicycles!

  • 68mm so I guess ISO with left and right handed threads. A bit of grease on the threads on my book :) Italian with both right hand threads makes some people reach for the locktite....

  • Additional question is that you always install the drive side first....why is this

    Drive side has a flange that bottoms out on the frame shell (or spacer, if you’re so inclined/ordered the wrong bb) and the other side just tightens the bb in place. The flange ensures the end of the bb spindle is the correct distance from the centre line of the frame (i.e. so all your nicely calculated chainlines will be right).

    I have used regular grease on square taper bb threads/cups for ages now (is also what I use currently) and anti seize on the threads in the past and both have been fine and I’ve not died and the bbs have all come out again.

    Is this for the actual track (I’ve had no experience of this) or for the road?

  • Italian

    And French

  • Anti seize (the solid bits) will still be there ready to do its job when the grease is only a memory.

  • I’ve only ever used grease. The bb in my Russian bike is right-hand threaded on both sides and it has never come undone either.

  • I grease.

    Don’t really like anti-seize as it seems like you pop a tiny bit on some thread somewhere and then no matter how thoroughly you clean your hands, before you know it you’ve got it your face, the saddle and bar tape, your front door at home...

  • This is why I changed also. It stains all the things.

  • What is the frame material and what is the bottom bracket made of?

  • £2.50, will last you years, and do all the jobs requiring grease on a fixed gear. You're welcome.

  • Thanks very much for recommending such mediocre grease.

  • Oh Alex. Why the edit?

  • Grease is fine for normal people, but I put anti seize for customers that don't ever do any maintenance, or the pressure washer addicts.

  • Normal grease suffers from wash out too.

  • I thought the original was a bit unfair on your shite lithium grease, although it's very basic stuff, shit might be too damning. Maybe not. It's not really particularly good value either. You could buy any number of much better greases for less if you get a 500g tub or 400g tube.

    For less money per gram though you can buy various calcium sulphonate thickened grease which is inherently corrosion inhibiting, more water resistant, and with extreme pressure additives and some Moly to boot, if you like.

    Grease is better than nothing but it's not as good as anti seize for preventing threaded joints and fasteners seizing, strangely enough: that's why anti seizes exist. You might not touch a square taper sealed BB for ten years and you got to ask yourself what is going to give me the best chance of getting it out at that point. It doesn't take a pressure washer or neglect, just the slow intrusion of water down the seat tube.

  • 500g tub or 400g tube.

    That's quite literally hundreds of BB jobs.

    You might not touch a square taper sealed BB for ten years

    Unlikely. Also in that scenario your 500g tub is going to last you centuries.

    you got to ask yourself what is going to give me the best chance of
    getting it out at that point.

    May I suggest the odd BB removal, regardless of replacement? If only to wipe the BB shell clean.

    tl;dr I know TF2 is basic, but we're not talking about rocket engines here. It does the job of greasing a BB cup in most scenarios. It certainly hasn't failed me in all the years I have been using it.

  • That's quite literally hundreds of BB jobs.

    Is that the only place you grease on your bike? If it's just for BB just buy a small tube of copper anti seize for the same price. You can also use it on other fasteners, especially those prone to seizing.

    If you plan to use the same grease for other bike jobs like hubs and headsets you might as well buy something better suited and use a dab for the BB threads. White lithium has literally nothing to recommend it over other greases that you could use on your bike. It's good for your interior door hinges though.

    Unlikely.

    I get five to ten years out of a shimano BB for commuting. My wife's bike which sees less use will nearly certainly be on the same BB then.

    May I suggest the odd BB removal, regardless of replacement? If only to wipe the BB shell clean.

    Sure, it's very good practice. And if there's any chance that you forget, or don't have the time, or some worst case scenario occurs and you don't do this preventative maintenance then you'll be better off with anti seize.

  • In my experience (as a mech that’s worked in shops) when you get a bb that’s a struggle to remove there’s usually no trace of anything in there. So either grease washes out entirely, leaving no trace, or grease works as well as anti seize.

  • titanium bolts into carbon. should I use copper grease?

  • Normally the threads on a carbon frame are aluminium inserts. You should use a product that's appropriate for that combination. I believe copper grease is OK for it.

  • There is a thread with much more discussion of these things...

    https://www.lfgss.com/conversations/2573­49/?offset=100#comment14978884

  • The OP has given up I think ;-)

  • Should know better than to ask for a simple answer on here...

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Anti-Seize OR Grease on Threaded Square Taper Bottom Bracket?

Posted by Avatar for LeslieLamLam @LeslieLamLam

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