donny's thankful

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  • This is my way to say thanks to this forum. I've learned a lot here, about a lot of things I guess. One would say about bikes, but you've got so much more to give: from brexit info and the latest news from down under to the dankest memes and local quarrel popcorn thunder (English is not my native tongue but I try). I decided to actively join just recently and I hope I can contribute to this community that has brought me so much useful and useless knowledge. It has also brought me new inspiration to do stuff with my stuff. Therefor I need a CP thread of my own. I hope you don't mind.

  • So I got my city rider around 7 years ago, which 2as someones nr1 road bike until he got some cf to get along with. It looked and went pretty decent for a city bike.


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  • But after 7 years of riding this almost unchanged, with exception of some minimal maintainence here and there, inspiration from the forum and old age got me into the riser-culture. I had no idea what to expect, but I had some deore brake levers about and got a lovely narrow sawn-off riser from the local classifieds (of a lovely chap called Kahn). I tried to fix it all up meself but the stem was stuck af after 7 years in cold weather wetness and salt. Luckily my guru lbs and moral compass Theo helped me out. He put the fork crown in his vice, with a strap attaching the stem to a lifting beam at string tension that would encourage Bootsy Collins to play a funky bass line. Theo really ripped that stuck stem right off and gave me room to make this nice old road bike into a proper riser rat.


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  • Now it rides really sweet, I can recommend the riser to anyone who likes a little unstableness and daily bit of danger in their commute. But it also feels more upright than before (it's a 59cm frame), which makes me feel old, rigid and unagile (is that a word?) in the saddle. Now I want to stick with the riser, but should I change the frame? I have this kinda cool 56cm Batavus Professional track frame, which was converted to a road bike by the previous owner. Yes, that's correct, a track-to-road-conversion:

  • .


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  • I will try the Gazelle for at least a week, but if this upright position starts to bore, I'm keen on getting that Batavus out of the storage and try the track geo on the streets. But I'm also ready to be influenced by some more experienced riser riders here. So feel free to let me know what to do.

  • Welcome to the Forum :) That batavus track bike looks awesome. I also ride a 56cm batavus professional with riser bars and I really enjoy it. I generally prefer slightly ‘too small’ frames since I prefer the shorter top tube. Judging by the photos, it looks like you live in the netherlands so if I were you, I’d turn the track batavus into a single speed and keep the brakes.
    P.s. keep in mind that the track bike has a higher BB, so the standover height of the 59 road and the 56 track should be fairly similar. So the bars won’t neccessarily be lower when measured from the ground but there will be more saddle to bar drop due to the high BB.


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  • Thanks for the welcome and tips! You're right about the bb hight, didn't think of that yet. That's why you have to track stand at the traffic lights I guess. Riding fixed has crossed my mind a lot, but indeed not without brakes since I've never skid in my life and considering the traffic here combined with my clumsy self would be lethal. It's drilled feont and rear so no reason to ride without. Is riding fixed with a rear brake something frowned upon by y'all fixie fanatics?

    btw Great Batavus you got there! Looks like a tight crit geo. What are those fenders may I ask?

  • It might have been frowned upon back in the days but the tide has turned meaning that functional fixed gears with brakes are now en vogue. With the fork and bridge already drilled you can avoid the dilemma of having a road legal bike v keeping it in its original state. You could try a flip flop hub and see if you like it better as a fixed or a single speed. Cheers for the kind words for my batavus. The geometry is indeed pretty aggressive, it’s columbus slx and rides really well. The mudguards are sks longblades modded with a full extension to cover the tyre around the seattube. The three flaps are DIY additions.

  • Wow this riser thing is so much fun. I feel like a kid again swerling through them tourist folk.


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donny's thankful

Posted by Avatar for damskodonny @damskodonny

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