1925 Bruneau-Durieux - the next project on the bench

Posted on
Page
of 3
Prev
/ 3
Next
  • On a more positive note, I did spend a fun few days in Central France, helping a pal with his stall at the retro market in Lyon, Les Puces du Canal. Before the market on Sunday we spent a few days visiting all the vide greniers, brocantes and recycling centres (emmaus) we could find. I had very slim pickings bicycle wise. There was very little early stuff around, so I am still on the hunt for a set of brakes and levers. I did find a few tool pouches though, incliding my favourite find, a triangular crossbar pouch. It's very tired, but definitely worth saving. It must be at least 100 years old. (It's a perfect fit in the frame on the Bruneau Durieux)


    Brocante treasures by Mike, on Flickr


    Brocante treasures by Mike, on Flickr


    Brocante treasures by Mike, on Flickr

    Also a few saddle tool pouches. The top one looks the oldest, and will go on the bike.


    Brocante treasures by Mike, on Flickr


    Brocante treasures by Mike, on Flickr

  • Wonderful work so far...subbed

  • Thanks. Just itching to ride the thing! I wish I knew where these pedals off Hilary were ... Need to start putting some serious miles on this brute very soon!

  • I usually just email him to buy stuff, he seems to reply to that. Perhaps try that?

  • I'll try that Jeff. Facebook isn't everyones ideal form of communication. Although it shows he has seen my message I sent on Tuesday.

  • There are regularly threads on here and Retro Bike complaining about Hilary Stone. The guy seems to need constant chasing.

  • Ha! That's good to know for the future. I've never bought anything from him so no previous dealings. A polite email worked, (third time lucky) I got a very apologetic reply saying they would be posted out first thing Monday.

  • Just found this French 1925 cycle parts catalogue on flickr, great reference!

    messner2526 p111 by patricia m, on Flickr

  • Really enjoying restoring this 100 year old bicycle tool pouch. Given it a good clean, fed the leather, then dismantled it as all the stitching was rotten. Now reassembly! Using a method I’ve seen Suzie Fletcher use on BBC’s The Repair Shop, using two needles and lacing the thread up. It’s working a treat!
    Still need to source three new straps to fit it to the frame.


    Tool pouch restoration by Mike, on Flickr


    Tool pouch restoration by Mike, on Flickr


    Tool pouch restoration by Mike, on Flickr

  • Very satisfying

  • Dammit ... I shouldn't have got my hopes up! Still no pedals ... He said he'd post out Monday.

  • Bike restorations that involve sewing are the best sort of bike restorations.

  • Hopefully hooking up with Tim Gunn next week, as he has most of the parts this machine is currently missing, including Bowden brakes.
    I'm also on the hunt for some period style kit to wear on it, which is proving rather difficult.
    As we're planning to do some pretty long rides, wool or cotton is going to be best.
    This place has some great ones, but all the best ones are out of stock. High button up neck, front and back pockets, stripe design.

    https://www.3mcaverni.com/prodotto/magli­a-ciclismo-vintage-in-lana-a-coste-manic­a-lunga-anni-1020?fbclid=IwAR3fzRYYKRIXd­uZP3Ou_Jz-Ul0tBdYTbDuVmNozl63_MdwQmz6Kr4­x95E88

    And some style inspiration


    4c00cc07855a314320d74b9ddb2617e9-1 by Mike, on Flickr


    Valloton, Egg, Petit-Breton 1912, course Paris Tours by Mike, on Flickr

  • Bruneau-Derieux progress
    My long awauted pedals from Hilary Stone have gone awry but I found a pair in my stash bin that fitted! Far from ideal as they are modern and chrome, but they are obviously a big step in making it rideable.
    Rear brake from a VCC contact Paul, thanks mate! Matched with an old lever and cable from the spares bin. Again, not period correct but enough to get it rolling (and stopping!) while better parts are sourced.
    Wheel rims in the process of being stripped back to the metal. They were well painted, but the primer used was bright white, and looked horrible where it had chipped throught he dark burgandy top coat.
    Sporting two of the overhauled leather tool pouches from the recent brocante trip.
    Newbaum's Green Khaki tape on order for the handlebars.
    Need to rob some suitably rusty toe clips from another bike to add to the pedals, and I have a rusty old twin bottle cage than needs to go on too. Only issue with that is it makes the top of the bars impossible to hold.


    Bruneau-Derieux progress by Mike, on Flickr


    Bruneau-Derieux progress by Mike, on Flickr


    Bruneau-Derieux progress by Mike, on Flickr


    Bruneau-Derieux progress by Mike, on Flickr


    Bruneau-Derieux progress by Mike, on Flickr


    Bruneau-Derieux progress by Mike, on Flickr

  • Lovely stuff Mike.

    Great to see your restore of that frame bag, and the catalogue image too.

    Chapeau bas!

  • I’ve been eyeing up the early cycle gear from 3mcaverni for a while. My experience is it’s quite easy to find original mid 60s or later cycle gear, but it’s difficult to find anything earlier than that. I’ve seen some very tatty 50s jerseys, but it’s usually only surviving because it’s got some race heritage, so it’s usually expensive and too fragile to actually use. I’ve actually never seen anything earlier than that for sale.

    Great pics btw. I’m quite enjoying the toe clip straps to hold their tubs on their shoulders - I’ve never noticed that before.

  • Ditto, I've only seen photos of pre WW2 cycling kit in collections and museums. This stuff basically got worn till it fell apart back then I guess. And under racing conditions that wouldn't have been very long I think.
    There is a guy called Fausto in Italy who makes bespoke merino wool race jerseys to your spec. They are €240.
    Me and Ben are going to go with a couple of the 3mcaverni jerseys as a 'cheap' option to get us looking the part.

  • Very bad form of me, but I failed to update this thread after our ride. It's been quite pleasant going back through the album and remembering the heatwave we rode through! And obviously it got warmer the further south we headed!
    The only mechanical issue we had was with my bicycle, and that was very early on in the first 10km. It was fairly catastophic, but luckily it only set us back a few hours. My front wheel bearing adusters we not set up right, and the motion of the wheel turning would slowly tighten them, resulting ultimately in a locked wheel, split adjusting cone, and a few bust ball bearings. Thankfully with help from the support vehicle and a local Sports Direct we managed to dismantle and reassemble the hub, minus a couple of bearings, and carry on. After this it surprisingly gave us no bother at all!
    We managed the 500km over 72 hours, not bad on our old single speed crocks, including back to back 100 mile rides.
    I'd do it again in a heartbeat! I haven't ridden the bike since though. I took it out once on the commute to work afterwards, and despite being a glorious morning, the evening ride home was wet, and this thing has zero brakes in even midly damp conditions. It's been hung up in the shed since!

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/29051501@N­08/albums/72157710989805916/page1


    Paris to Angoulême, Day 3 - Loche to Grosbout, 94.5 miles by Mike, on Flickr

    Paris to Angoulême, Day 1 - Montlhery to Orleans by Mike, on Flickr


    Paris to Angoulême, Day 2 - Orleans to Loche, 105 miles by Mike, on Flickr


    Paris to Angoulême, Day 4 - Grosbout to Angoulême, 38 miles by Mike, on Flickr


    Paris to Angoulême, Day 4 - Grosbout to Angoulême, 38 miles by Mike, on Flickr


    Paris to Angoulême by Mike, on Flickr

    The strava stats

    http://www.strava.com/activities/2697610­537

    http://www.strava.com/activities/2700360­272

    http://www.strava.com/activities/2702968­287

    http://www.strava.com/activities/2704469­208

  • I've got to say, you look excellent!

  • Fantastic stuff, very thoroughly done!

  • Great thread, well done!

  • Thanks for the nice comments!

    After the sale of an old bike I had kicking around untouched at the back of the shed since I got it at the carboot 17 years ago, (A prewar Raleigh Sport) I decided to treat the B-D to some new shoes. I was never happy with the old black roadster tyres, especially as it looked so good in those cream Schwalbes, but I had to go with what fitted through that tight front fork gap.
    I found a seller on ebay selling roadster tyres in several colours, and although he didn't have any in cream, these are a natural rubber shade, and I'm happy with them. Two tyres and two woods valve inner tubes, for under £40 isn't bad either, especially as they came from Germany.

    Currently off work, so enjoying having time to tinker on this machine again. I haven't ridden it properly since the big ride we did, as it isn't a winter ride. Took it for a 14 mile spin around the block for my daily exercise and fell in love with it again, although I was also reminded of all the aches and pains and numbness it gave me on the ride in France last year!

    Still a few jobs to do on it. A front brake would be useful, and I am kicking myself I missed out on the perfect one on ebay (I was the underbidder). An older saddle would look good, in the mean tme I need to try and reshape the 1963 Ideale I currently have on it.


    New rubber for the BD by Mike, on Flickr


    New rubber for the BD by Mike, on Flickr


    New rubber for the BD by Mike, on Flickr


    New rubber for the BD by Mike, on Flickr


    New rubber for the BD by Mike, on Flickr

  • Nice tortoise

  • That's Eddy. We inherited him last year. He's only 10, worlds top hide and seek champion already though.

  • Post a reply
    • Bold
    • Italics
    • Link
    • Image
    • List
    • Quote
    • code
    • Preview
About

1925 Bruneau-Durieux - the next project on the bench

Posted by Avatar for Quiet_Mike @Quiet_Mike

Actions