Cycling around the world / world circumnavigation

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  • Since riding 'around the world', as far as that is possible without hitting bridgeless salty water, now seems to be something people do quite regularly, I thought a thread might be in order. Some of these rides have been covered in Ultracycling, but as not all rides around the world are 'ultra', some being quite slow and touristy, they wouldn't all fit in there.

    Of previous threads, we've had two on Julian Sayarer:

    https://www.lfgss.com/events/338/
    https://www.lfgss.com/conversations/1599­34/

    I can't find a thread about Mark Beaumont's rides around the world, although there are two other threads about him. We posted about it in the Ultracycling thread, before and after here: https://www.lfgss.com/comments/13858533/­

    Among other threads, there is this, but the original link doesn't work any more and I don't know what it was about:

    https://www.lfgss.com/conversations/2171­92/


    Needless to say, people have made a world record out of this (although see below for people who ride in other ways and for other reasons):

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Around_the­_world_cycling_record

    The Wikipedia page has a list of all the serious attempts so far, including reasons why they were not counted.

    The current female around-the-world record holder is Jenny Graham from these very shores:

    http://theadventuresyndicate.com/round-t­he-world
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jenny_Grah­am
    https://www.cyclinguk.org/press-release/­can-cycling-uk-member-jenny-graham-break­-female-record-cycling-around-world

    She broke the record previously held by Paola Gianotti, a record having originally been set by Juliana Buhring. Her record now stands at 124 Days, 10 hours, and 50 minutes.

    The current male record holder is Mark Beaumont, with 78 days, 14 hours, and 40 minutes (see the above link on the world record), although it must be noted that the two records are very different. He was heavily supported, while Jenny Graham was unsupported.


    There have been quite a few, and I'm sure there will continue to be, more colourful attempts, including these--please post if you know of others:

    Richard Evans rode around the world on his recumbent a few years ago and wrote a book about it:

    http://laidbackaroundtheworld.blogspot.c­om/

    Joff Summerfield has ridden all over on his ordinary bike:

    https://www.pennyfarthingworldtour.com/

    (I remember his web-site as having more blog content rather than pictures, but I last looked at it about ten years ago, I think.)

    Ed Pratt is riding a unicycle (thanks to @greentricky for the info):

    https://www.youtube.com/user/worldunicyc­letour/videos

    More pertinent to this here forum, Markus Stitz rode single-speed in 2017:

    http://markusstitz.com/round-the-world-s­inglespeed/
    https://road.cc/content/news/202580-edin­burgh-cyclist-rides-round-world-singlesp­eed-bike

    Not to be outdone, Foffa Bikes seem to have the following link, but as my browser said it was an insecure connection ('The owner of foffabikes.com has configured their web site improperly.'), I thought I wouldn't risk it. It might be full of ... well, you know.

    https://foffabikes.com/around-the-world-­on-a-foffa/

    Apparently, the rider was one Daniel Papadopoulos, in 2014, but I can't easily find any other info on his attempt.


    Here's what seems the latest attempt, by Charlie Condell:

    https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2019­/mar/11/bristol-teenager-who-lost-bike-i­n-australia-completes-solo-round-the-wor­ld-cycle

    It's unknown whether @Sam_Doman has set off on his sailing trip yet, but of course it's a little off-topic for 'General'. :)

    https://www.lfgss.com/conversations/2720­42/

    I'm sure there are more, so please add them if you know of them.

  • Stephen Fabes runs one of the more comprehensive blogs about his 6 continent fully-loaded tour, and he's a really good writer too: https://cyclingthe6.com

    A particularly good read is his post about homesickness: https://cyclingthe6.com/2016/01/the-succ­or-of-homesickness.html/

    "On most of the two thousand odd mornings I have woken into, the spot I’ll end the day is a handsome mystery, generously glimmering beyond the horizon. The ugly certitude of my sleeping place is what may ache and pull at my fabric most after I return. But even so, I face down a fact, more so every day, that invites me home: I’m tired. Not of travel per say, not frazzled, bored and jaded by the world, but tired of the daily eschewing of any flake of familiarity. Tired of reliance: on hosts, on myself. Tired mentally, not physically. Tired of scrabbling for money, of supernoodles, of solitude and of the ever-expanding game of waking befuddled in my tent and mentally pursuing my place on the planet. Tired of the newness of my friends, the oldness of my socks and the staleness of my bread. Not so long ago I tried, absentmindedly, to change gear whilst pushing a trolley around a supermarket, and I think if life is providing a nudge to stop riding and go home, perhaps it’s the realisation that supermarket trolleys don’t come with grip shifts."

  • the realisation that supermarket trolleys don’t come with grip shifts

    I love that

  • Here’s another fun blog that’s worth digging into: http://differentpartsofeverywhere.com

    For anyone who’s interested, last year I planned out a loaded RTW trip on a Google Sheet with visas, itineraries, gear and all that. Can share!

  • For anyone who’s interested, last year I planned out a loaded RTW trip on a Google Sheet with visas, itineraries, gear and all that. Can share!

    Yeah, that'd be interesting.

    Another blog: https://weleaf.nl/en/

  • Sure thing - here you go: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1­HHs0Mj5P10G9hpop4yrvnT8Ww4kG_UiasW3am5vz­H6Y/edit?usp=sharing

    Note that this is based on travelling heavily loaded, camping wild and being fully self-sufficient in remote areas. The gear is probably overkill, but very much based around worst case scenario type planning, and some money could be saved with clever sourcing/second hand bits.

    The visas are based on a UK passport and should be up to date (Brexit notwithstanding...).

    The route is a classic sort-of-clockwise trip from London over four years, heading east through Europe to Central Asia to India, SE Asia, China, Oz/NZ, then onto the very southern tip of Argentina, all the way up to Vancouver, across Canada and then back home again via Portugal/Spain/France. Mapping is old school, which adds some cost but more relaxed perhaps.

    Budget wise, I've factored in 5 USD per day living costs, which is pretty generous once you get outside of western Europe. £11.5k for four years on the road isn't bad, when you consider all the gear. I reckon it could be done for a whole lot less than this, and I wanted to show how much it would be at the very most.

  • Ah, very good. I should have known that this would soon turn into a DIY thread on here. :)

    Thanks for the extra links!

  • Pen Bic Cristal Amazon £3.00

    why

    Digital camera Fujifilm X10 eBay £90.00

    wow bargain

  • Thread has to include Ed Pratt, round the world on a unicycle

    His youtube channel
    https://www.youtube.com/user/worldunicyc­letour/videos

  • Thanks! I'll add it to the OP (and I'll edit the title again, to which I had foolishly added 'by bike' :) ).

  • wow. Very thorough. In my opinion that is overkill (especially the occasional use "fix" items, which you would be able to divert to a city/town to buy?), but I guess some people aren't into eating nothing but mentos for three days at a time/hastily washing their bib shorts and their bums in a cafe bathroom once every few days/using zip ties to fix everything. And I guess doing that for two months vs four years is a totally different story. I imagine you'll want some comfort/sense of security. It sounds like a fabulous trip! Don't know how it's possible to go back to "real life" after four years on the road.

  • Definitely overkill! One of those things where you have to decide how self sufficient you want to be - Uzbekistan, for example, apparently has not a single bike shop, but spares could obviously be shipped from home. It was a fun exercise to figure out in any case

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Cycling around the world / world circumnavigation

Posted by Avatar for Oliver Schick @Oliver Schick

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