Cargo Bike Delivery Cyclist

Posted on
  • Zedify is shaking up the delivery business in central London! We care about air which is why we offer an emissions-free logistics solution across multiple cities in the UK including Glasgow, Brighton, Norwich and Cambridge. London is our next target, we're already up and pedalling in the Waltham Forest borough and recently started operations in central London. The work is coming in thick and fast! So much so we're looking to hire a part-time cargo bike rider ASAP to assist with the next phase of the expansion. We're looking for a candidate with the following:

    1. Level 3 bikeability certificate (details on where this can be
      obtained can be provided, it's free!)
    2. Preferably has experience riding cargo bikes.
    3. The necessary level of fitness for riding long hours and manual
      handling of goods. A team player with a can-do attitude is essential.

    The role is currently being offered on a part-time basis at the London living wage £10.20/hour with 22 days holiday allowance (holiday is accrued on a monthly basis in your first year). Bikes and training are provided.

    To find out more about us visit zedify.co.uk and for an application pack contact london@zedify.co.uk

    Ben Plunkett
    Duty Manager
    Zedify London


    1 Attachment

    • IMG_20180706_154505.jpg
  • Just curious if you have any experience or knowledge of being a delivery boy?
    I mean, 22 days holiday pa for this laborious job at minimum wage. Perhaps you should roll up your sleeves and get down to it yourself you entitlement prick. It isn't exactly an office job where everyone is working half asleep for much of the day.

  • 22 days holiday and £10.20 an hour is pretty good, speaking from experience of being a self employed courier and not receiving any holiday, plus being paid per job. I'm guessing public holidays are separate from personal holiday allowance

    OP:
    Do I need bikeability? I know how to ride a cargo, and have been a courier for a number of years, that's the one good thing about a bike, you don't need anything to say that you can ride one!
    You'll also struggle to find anyone with courier experience that'll have it aswell! Well anyone that's still on the road!

  • Just curious if you have any experience or knowledge of being a delivery boy?

    Do you? Because this pay is above average for the job

  • There is a difference being self employed. You get to pick and choose your holidays and work schedule. The self employed role isn't designed to be a long term solution by any stretch of the imagination.

  • Why don't you be their guest, see how long you last in your new "career".

  • Yeah, that's a perk, but then you also don't get paid for the holiday which this company if offering, you also have no workers rights. Which by the sounds of this is an employed position, you'll have rights at work.

  • The point is, this isn't a long term role however much they dress it up.

  • We're looking for a candidate with the following:

    Level 3 bikeability certificate (details on where this can be
    obtained can be provided, it's free!)

    As with bicycle mechanics, the people that have felt the need to do a course and earn a certificate probably weren't very good at doing the thing in the first place.

  • Still much more secure than the self employed route....you seem like fun at parties.

  • The certificate is merely a superficial filter of the applicants because everyone's an expert these days. Who do they choose? The ones with a certificate of-course.

  • As I posted, no courier is going to have a 'License' is a bit silly they're asking for that, I can wheelie a cargo, so that should suffice no?

  • The point is, this isn't a long term role however much they dress it up.

    How many couriers move on to do other things because they are sick of not getting paid holidays, not getting sick pay (which this, as an employed position would, I'd have thought, have to provide) and not getting paid enough when jobs are lacking?

    Sounds like this bunch are looking for a reliable person who wants to work outside and will reward that person with a steady income and many of the benefits that are lacking in other courier type work.

    Just because it wouldn't work for you doesn't mean it won't work for anyone.

  • How many couriers move on to do other things because they are sick of
    not getting paid holidays, not getting sick pay (which this, as an
    employed position would, I'd have thought, have to provide) and not
    getting paid enough when jobs are lacking?

    This is one of the major reasons I'm taking my first steps away from it!

  • I suspect its more likely that the bikeability thing is about them, as an employer, being able to say (incase of accident etc) that the people riding for them do so at a good standard and their way of proving that is that they have a bikeability certificate.

    I've had to go through mechanic training and get certificated (almost against my wishes) for my employer for this very reason.

    @ZedifyLondon perhaps you might want to remove this as a requirement and arrange a course once you have done the hiring? There are at least a few cycle trainers on here who could probably help you arrange this kind of thing.

  • In my view they covered your final point in their first point when it was said they were willing to provide assistance and all in all is a pretty reasonable advert with most things explained, as is your post.

  • Well that escalated quickly...

    One of my two main issues with being a courier here in Cardiff is the absence of any guaranteed earnings, and no holiday days. This seems to be a new company trying to offer both that suggests they have done it before. I would snap their hand off if they were in my neck of the woods.

  • Please post video of cargo bike wheelie

  • Are you mad? Are you factoring in working 5 from 7 days?

    Also if anyone is a prick- you def win that award.

  • @ZedifyLondon Open up in Cardiff

  • Do I need bikeability? I know how to ride a cargo, and have been a courier for a number of years, that's the one good thing about a bike, you don't need anything to say that you can ride one!

    Bear in mind that Bikeability (at levels 2 and 3) isn't about whether you can ride a bike (just like driving lessons don't just teach you how to operate a car) . It deals with how to ride a bike on road and best practice for riding among other road users. That seems probably even more relevant if you're riding something that's closer to car-sized than the average bike.

    "Level 3 equips trainees with skills for more challenging roads and traffic situations – busier streets, queuing traffic, complex junctions and roundabouts. It also includes planning routes for safe cycling. Level 3 training is delivered one-to-one or in groups of up to 3 so can be tailored to a trainee’s individual needs, such as a route to work or school. At Level 3 you can: prepare for a journey, understand advanced road positioning, pass queuing traffic, perceive and deal with hazards, understand driver blind spots, react to hazardous road surfaces"

  • Post a reply
    • Bold
    • Italics
    • Link
    • Image
    • List
    • Quote
    • code
    • Preview
About

Cargo Bike Delivery Cyclist

Posted by Avatar for ZedifyLondon @ZedifyLondon

Actions