• Isn't the only issue with compatibility between "natural" and "synthetic" latex? Otherwise they all should work.

  • Don't DM me when your tyre explodes.

  • Given I’m not sure what’s in both sets of wheels contemplating starting a fresh.
    Anyone using run flats on a gravel bike are they any good?

  • Ok, so I bought Dick's crazy Spengle wheels and, despite reading the first post carefully, I'm really struggling to set them up tubeless (they are tubeless only rims and I have tubeless tyres).

    I've read and followed the first post carefully but no way can I get the tyres to 'seat' with a regular track pump as the hookless rim design just means that the air goes out as fast as it goes in. So far I haven't added tape as the rims don't need it but suspect I may do so to give a tighter fit. I'm also tempted to get one of those Airshot compressors (or similar, perhaps even the Srewfix sprayer linked to a few pages back) but it seems like I'll just get air shooting out the sides at higher pressure rather than sealing.

    So, what basic errors am I making? And, is there anyone within reasonable distance of Herefordshire who could help out/show me what to do for payment/beers?

  • what basic errors am I making?

    First post doesn't mention lube. Have you ever seen a tyre tech at your local garage not use lube? Of course not. Seating a tyre is a fight between the aerodynamic drag of leaking air trying to push the bead up onto the shelf and the friction trying to stop it from going there. Make sure it's an unequal fight by reducing the friction.

    Also missing from post one is the fact that folding bike tyres are not very stiff and tend to have kinks in the beads from being folded in the packaging for months. You might have to seat them on the rims using an inner tube and leave them for a day or two to let the kinks work out. A bead which is actually circular is much more likely to lay evenly against the slope of the rim bed and seal enough to get pushed up onto the shelf.

  • So far I haven't added tape as the rims don't need it

    I’d start with a couple of wraps of tape

  • Put soapy water on the beads to help them slide into place. If that doesn't work try a track pump with a reservoir. If that doesn't work try a compressor. I find that a 150 litre compressor at 200psi will get even the most reluctant tyre to seat.

  • 150 litre compressor at 200psi will get even the most reluctant tyre to seat.

    And quite possibly blow it right off the rim🙂 A cautious person would probably calculate the reservoir volume, tyre volume and initial reservoir pressure such that the equilibrium pressure after filling the tyre assuming no air loss would not exceed the maximum pressure rating of the tyre.

  • Also, wear ear and eye protection. A tyre failing under over-pressure is like a bomb going off. Ask me how I know 🙂

  • You have not lived until you blow a tyre off a rim ! Then felt physically sick

  • Thanks for the tips, much appreciated and will line up the bead and go from there (I did think of popping in inner tubes but didn’t have any with long enough valves plus if putting the tubes in would be likely to just ride them like that).

    Rim is as pictured and understood that it needed no further prep but taking up space with tape makes sense.

    Finally, an exploding tyre sounds a touch alarming (an exploding tube is bad enough!) - I’m not going to be deterred (yet!) but is this tubeless lark a disproportionate solution to a modest problem as it seems quicker just to bang a tube in and go?


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  • It's not advisable to use an innertube with a hookless bead. You're better off persevering with the tubeless for sure.

  • You could inflate the tyre on another rim for a while with a tube if it's the folded bead causing a problem, but I'd just whack a load of air through it with a compressor too, just stop whacking loads of air through it as it grabs and then add more carefully until seated properly.

  • If that doesn't work try a compressor. I find that a 150 litre compressor at 200psi will get even the most reluctant tyre to seat.

    I think if you get here there is something wrong with the setup. As @gbj_tester said it's about finding the right balance in fit, but it should go up with a pump/air shot.

  • Rim is as pictured and understood that it needed no further prep but taking up space with tape makes sense.

    Also have sealed rims, depending on the tyres I use on the I need between 2 and 4 layers of tape, with sometimes 2.5 or 3.5 (last layer only for half circumference) to get the tape thickness to "shim" the fit appropriately

  • Further good tips (why did I not think of mounting them with tubes on another rim 🤦♂️), will give them a go and report back

  • My front is very low. It seems still to be seated. I suspect the sealant has dried out as it’s not been ridden much by previous owner. Do I whack a tube in or go with any sealant I can find ahead of tomorrow’s ride?

  • Whack sealant and carry a tube
    Pump it up, if it holds overnight, good to go. If it doesn't, put tube in before you leave. Get up 15 minutes earlier to check this.

  • Not a bad idea

  • I have these tubless ready wheels from my specialized Diverge (Axis Elite) and am trying to run them tubeless but the valve just pisses air out

    The valve screw bit doesnt seem to be the right shape for the rim and its not creating anywhere near an air tight fit.

    Ive tried with the rubber grommet on the inside (pictured) and the outside but it's so far off creating an airtight seal

    Will I have better success with a different brand of valves?


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  • Will I have better success with a different brand of valves?

    Quite possibly, but the valve screw shouldn't be the bit that's sealing the valve. It's the end of the valve inside the rim which should be doing the sealing. Relying on the valve screw to seal the tyre means you'd also have to rely on all the spoke holes being airtight, which they won't be, and if the valve doesn't seal against the rim bed then the sealant will go inside the rim where the ammonia in the sealant will eat away your spoke nipples and cause them to fail. Don't ask how I know this...

  • Suspect the hole that you have created in the tubeless tape is too large. It's very easy to make it too big - one way is over-tightening the valve once it's inserted. I'd suggest adding a couple more layers of tape, then make a small hole using the inside bit of a biro. You can then push the valve gently through so the hole is quite snug

  • ah, I just tried that and despite best effort to clean the area where I needed to add more tape it looks like I need to take off the tyre and completely remove all sealant to get it to adhere.

    I did use just a small screwdriver prior. Such a ball ache.

  • Flogging a dead horse . Whip it all off but put your tape on a radiator first to soften it up. Then get the rim spotless . I had lifeline valves that where rubbish so changed to mucoff.

  • no luck, tried it once more from fresh, so much air leakage, not even close..

    Put some tubes back in, will probably revisit in 6 months

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Tubeless Tyres -"saying the same things about tubeless tyres over and over again" Hippy read the first f**king post

Posted by Avatar for dancing james @dancing james

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