Seedrs investment

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  • This looks great. But no tax break. How would that work?

    https://www.seedrs.com/startups/happy-da­ys#qa

  • I also wonder how long it will be before Apple introduce a keyboard with fingerprint recognition and then how long it will be before they try and make a move to be the password provider for the internet.

    It will happen.

    You said it...
    http://www.apple.com/osx/whats-new/#iclo­ud-keychain

  • This looks great. But no tax break. How would that work?

    https://www.seedrs.com/startups/happy-da­ys#qa

    The amount of money they seek is above the SEIS limit and for whatever reason they are not EIS eligible (and you would not get that break).

    This means it's a standard investment.

    These things are all risky, and you basically invest on an emotional level or because you have the belief that you can achieve a 10x return on the investment.

    The strange thing about a musical is that whilst it may well produce a 10x return (costs compared to takings), I don't see that that would be returned to the shareholders in a meaningful manner as the track record of the majority of musicals is that they only have a shelf-life of a few years. And this offering is explicitly just for a tour of the show prior to any attempt at the West End.

    Given all of that, I'd say that investing would firmly be an emotional thing. Not that it's a bad thing, a lot of the arts are supported by patrons who don't expect a return. I'd adjust your expectations accordingly though, Microcosm may be risky but there is a hope of a return, with Happy Days I can't even see where the hope is, and that's presuming the tour is a success. The only meaningful thing you could get out of this would be the first right of refusal for investing in the West End show.

  • This looks great. But no tax break. How would that work?

    https://www.seedrs.com/startups/happy-da­ys#qa

    you invest, and if, very big if, it returns a profit, you'll get a share, which will be liable to cgt

    more eloquent version by vb. you might get a programme signed by the fonz

  • Sorry, that's not what I meant. Maybe I worded it ambiguously. I was just curious about it because it seemed different to a lot of Seedrs pitches:

    • any return would be paid quickly, as it's a finite run
    • without the tax break it would presumably not be as straightforward to add to a tax return
    • I was just pointing it out because, you know, the Fonz...
  • It wouldn't be any more complicated to account for on your return. The link doesn't work but I assume you're still buying shares in a company(?). So you just account for the gain from dividends/on disposal if and when it delivers a return.

    I'd be curious to know what it is that prevents it being EISable... possibly if the revenue is license or royalty based.

  • Has anyone seen Bird Cycleworks? Not convinced by 26b MTBs but I've given them a little because it's nice to see new bike companies launch.

  • Does anyone know how to cancel pending investments? I have a tenner in a couple of investments that just have no chance of getting to 100pc, and would rather have another punt now than have to wait 28 days for it to fail first.

  • just contact admin

  • Has anyone seen Bird Cycleworks? Not convinced by 26b MTBs but I've given them a little because it's nice to see new bike companies launch.

    Yes, they were in the recent email:

    https://www.seedrs.com/startups/bird-cyc­leworks

    Bird Cycleworks is developing a range of mountain bikes to exploit the growing direct sales model. In recent years, the cost of purchasing a bike has risen sharply, well over inflation, driving consumers to brands offering direct to customer sales, without retail shops in the distribution chain, reducing the costs to the consumer, allowing their money to go much farther.
    We think this has been exploited by only one company to any significant degree; Canyon. They have seen huge growth in the last 5 years as more consumers turn their backs on the high street model and go direct. You only need to visit a trail centre or bike race to see just how many Canyons there are in the UK now.
    We believe that this model is the growth sector of the market; companies like Giant and Specialized simply cannot capitalise due to distribution infrastructure and heavy reliance on retailers. We intend to become the UK's largest direct complete bike manufacturer, in a valuable and as yet relatively untapped market.

  • Yeah. Interesting. I've put a few quid in - look at Planet X and you can see that the potential is there. Bikes look OK, from pics and spec, and branding is nice enough.

  • Why 650b though? I hate ' new standards'. 26 or gtfo >>>

    Seriously though, as someone out of mtb for years now, how available are 650b tyres?

  • I thought that. I asked about it and they were adamant that all brands were heading that way. I don't buy that. But they also said that they'd consider doing 29ers in the future.

  • I'd be interested in a quick survey of LBS around me to see what tyres they stocked.

  • 650b are standard... for tourers. You'll find a lot of tyres, just not sure about full dirt handling MTB ones.

    I also looked at it, and if Bird were doing 29ers it would be a no-brainer. If they were doing 26 I'd seriously consider it. 650b? Erm.

  • Really? Touring standard? Since when? Most tourers I've seen were 700C. Personally I used a 26" MTB for touring.

    http://www.googlefight.com/index.php?lan­g=en_GB&word1=%22650b+touring+tyres%22&w­ord2=%22700c+touring+tyres%22

    and to eliminate any fruity US bias..
    http://www.googlefight.com/index.php?lan­g=en_GB&word1=650b+touring&word2=700c+to­uring

    See also the number of 622 vs. 584 choices..
    http://www.schwalbetires.com/product_sea­rch

  • 650b are standard... for tourers. You'll find a lot of tyres, just not sure about full dirt handling MTB ones.

    I also looked at it, and if Bird were doing 29ers it would be a no-brainer. If they were doing 26 I'd seriously consider it. 650b? Erm.

    I think they'll end up doing a 29er.

  • Seriously though, as someone out of mtb for years now, how available are 650b tyres?

    Not common enough to be trickling into sales , esp if bird is pitching itself as cheaper it needs to consider the fact that 650b may not be cheap to repair/replace bits and therefore would be a little backwards to go 650b if they want to be high value

  • Well, Bird have raised all the cash they need. Only took a few days.

  • Well, Bird have raised all the cash they need. Only took a few days.

    The swinley group had a fair bit of investment in it I think since a fair few of them got to test ride , still good to hopefully see a independent company do well

  • It's a fun idea that I'm now part-owner of a bike company, even if it's only a £50 share...

  • Sparky thanks for your investment. FWIW 650b tyres are pretty much supported on every model line now, and pricing is in line with 26 (unlike some of the crazy 29er pricing - like inner tubes). Thanks if you supported us!

  • Sparky thanks for your investment. FWIW 650b tyres are pretty much supported on every model line now, and pricing is in line with 26 (unlike some of the crazy 29er pricing - like inner tubes). Thanks if you supported us!

    So, how big is the shareholder discount? £50?

    ;)

  • Well, Bird have raised all the cash they need. Only took a few days.

    That is good news.

  • I've met most of the guys involved with Bird cycles, and I think they'll be a success. Well designed frames with decent kit for good prices. For the kind of bike they're making 650b makes sense IMO, it's much more popular in mtb than it was even 12 months ago.

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Seedrs investment

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