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  • How was it? Philly and marmite is my house toast topping, so I might have to try this

  • Fucking awesome! Half has gone

  • Just wanted to say thanks for this advice - I tried it out this Sunday and it worked brilliantly; first time I've ever managed to get the dough in the casserole dish without ANY sticking. The pattern it puts in the bread is very beautiful too.

  • Cheddar and jalapeño. Using mainly spelt flour.

    I grated the cheddar instead of cubes and worked much better. Cubes tend to evaporate and leave a cheddar coloured bubble but not much more.

    Pretty pleased though it’s got a fair kick. Superb with peanut butter and honey or maple syrup.


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  • Got an enormous rise out of today's pain de mie. Did all of the proofing in the oven on the lowest setting and I got an immediate throwback to the breads I made this summer. The proofing oven really is going to be a worthwhile project.


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  • Same question again as a reach the end of another 25kg bag of white flour... any recommendations?! so far I have tried, Shipton number 4 and the Farine Biologique T65 from bakery bits and preferred the T65

  • There is a stoneground t65 at bakery bits

  • Is a stoneground closer to a wholemeal flour? I read that stoneground flour will result in a tighter crumb because bran disrupts the gluten so how would it work for enriched dough brioche, babka etc?

  • Maybe. Not sure.

    Am stone grinding flour at home but that never comes out white at all -
    Though I am sifting my own flour as the bits of bran don’t help with long gluten chains. I have a bag of the stoneground t65 but am yet to use it. Looking at it the flour is pretty white. It is meant to have more flavour than conventionally milled flour.

  • This looks amazing! What weight roasted squash did you use to what weight flour? I can feel a pumpkin version coming on...

  • I’ve been getting back into the swing of things after a few months off due to, well, life...
    70% strong white, 10% wholemeal, 10% wholemeal rye, 10% wholemeal spelt. 72% hydration.


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  • Any ideas what would be a sensible amount of fresh yeast to substitute for the 60g sourdough in this pannetone recipe?

    https://thehappyfoodie.co.uk/recipes/pro­per-panettone

  • Those look amazing! I’ve been trying to get an ear similar to yours but I’ve always had an uncontrolled explosion along the cut. Is there a trick to it?

  • Today’s attempt, far better with dough temperature hovering around 25 Celsius during the bulk fermentation. But I’m looking forward to having more control than my oven is giving me.


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  • First panettone of the year. Much like my first attempt last year I think I baked too fast and rise was a little lacklustre. Crumb and flavour is lovely though. Need to order some more cases to have another crack at it.


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  • What recipe do you use? I've got some cases in the post to give it a try

  • I used the one a few posts up. I seem to remember I tried a couple lest year and one had better results than the other, though I can't find the other now and not sure which was the better one! I also used fresh yeast to speed things up a bit.

  • Is there LFGSS approved proofing basket?

  • I got a wood pulp one from Broadoak Nursery at the height of (first) lockdown. Have been using it without a linen liner and it works brilliantly with rice flour

  • you should have moved into Corbett, also happy birthday?

  • After some initial success with a sourdough panettone using Waitrose very strong Canadian white flour I thought I'd try "better" flour and used Mulino Marino 00 on Sunday.

    The Canadian flour developed very easily after 5-10 minutes in the stand mixer, however I was completely unable to develop gluten with the 00 flour. I think it way over fermented, despite the same temp and timing of the first rise.

    What I don't understand is that the gluten % for the 00 is similar to the Canadian, around 15%, however it's immediately apparent that the 00 flour has less strength.

    How does flour of similar strength act so differently?

  • Did you attempt the same hydration %? Typically 00 pizza/pizza flours have a much lower absorption potential than bread flours (https://thepizzaheaven.com/pizza-dough-h­ydration/).

    In theory, if the overall protein % is the same for the two flours but they behaved differently, it should be due to:

    1. What has been included/milled from each grain (bran v germ v endosperm), or
    2. Different ratios of glutenin and gliadin (the two gluten proteins) in the two flours

    Given you've used two white flours (no bran or germ), it could be due to the glutenin and gliadin ratios being different

  • Also suspect that the Canadian white flour is actually a hell of a lot stronger than the Mulino Marino. It's why American bakers seem to be able to push their hydration levels to c.90%+

  • That's interesting. So if I were to persist with 00 flour I shoudl try lowering the hydration a bit?

    Hydration was exactly the same both times, yes, ~54% in both the first and final doughs.

    This was the (long) recipe: http://www.wildyeastblog.com/panettone-r­ecipe/

    It's odd because the recipe says to use the same white flour they do for bread, which is counter to what I've heard of Brioche doughs requiring high strength flours. They also say that mixing (the final dough) can take upwards of 30 mins to even an hour. I ended up mixing for an hour just to be sure, but found no development. As I say the Canadian flour came together well under 10 mins.

    Thanks for your help.

  • Interesting - with all the other wet ingredients (yolks, butter) the final dough hydration in that recipe is effectively > 80%.

    I'd suspect that the MM flour was near it's limits in terms of hydration by Step 6. Maybe hold back water at Steps 7 & 8. Add just enough such that it looks like the canadian flour dough at that stage

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Bread

Posted by Avatar for MessenJah @MessenJah

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