Wheel building for polo

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  • Think this deserves it's own thread as we have different needs on our polo bikes.

    Did I read that it's a good idea to tension the spokes quite high?
    What's the best threading pattern for 48h 700c front?
    And what spokes?

    Thanks y'all.

  • What's the best threading pattern for 48h 700c front?

    Not gaydial... ;P

    Mine are 4x laced with plain gauge Sapims...

  • Ok,

    It's not 'threading' it's 'lacing'.

    High tension will snap easier.
    Low tension will give more in a crash and also allow the spoke to flex more under impact.

    Best spokes are Sapim Strong, they are for touring, and stronger than straight gauge.
    I've never broken one in 2 1/2 years.
    http://www.spacycles.co.uk/products.php?­plid=m2b67s156p1268

  • Cheers G.
    I knew that, not sure why I put threading.

    Is there a medium priced spoke or I guess that's probably a false economy?

    Does anyone have a 2 spare spokes and nipples so I can measure ERD's?

  • Google finds most ERDs

    Try Edd, it's pretty good, but double check the values that are already in there
    http://lenni.info/edd/

  • It's not 'threading' it's 'lacing'

    With the possible exception of Tioga Disc Drive.

  • High tension will snap easier.
    Low tension will give more in a crash and also allow the spoke to flex more under impact.

    Though presumably there's an optimum point somewhere in between. A wheel needs a certain amount of tension in order to hold its shape.

  • Google finds most ERDs

    Try Edd, it's pretty good, but double check the values that are already in there
    http://lenni.info/edd/

    I was reading this, but I guess it's a bit antiquated.
    http://www.wheelpro.co.uk/spokecalc/calc­-measure.pdf

    Edd is genius.

  • Plain gauge is the cheaper option to Sapim Strong and works ok for me (1 spoke broken every ~6 weeks from someone's pedal, or a hard shot)?

    I use too much tension, it means the ball never "squeezes" through your wheel, but they will snap if hit hard enough.

    Also, use brass nipples and not alloy. Brass is heavier but I used to break alloy nipples in half on my old wheels (probably down to needing longer spoke length too though)?

  • Alloy nipples are totally shit, on any bike.

  • Ti nipples?

  • How do you know what size nipple?
    Do not want to google at work.

  • 12mm is standard, and what I use, some people use 14mm.

  • The same size as your spoke... :P

    2mm spokes and 12mm long is normal, right?

  • 12mm is normal, I have a mix of 12mm and 14mm and have never noticed any difference between the two (breaks, etc).

  • Having all your nipples the same length makes it easier to get everything to the same tension when initially lacing the wheel, but once it's done I can't see how there'd be any difference in performance.

  • In theory you could lace a slightly shorter spoke up with a 14mm nipple, the nipple is likely to snap though (if the spoke doesn't protrude all the way through, etc).

  • link to your spokes jon?

    I like alloy nipples as they break and the spoke is fine, I have never had a sapim super break, just nipples. So I put new nipples in every 3 weeks or so.

  • I bought ACI Alpina plain gauge in the end, mainly because they were really cheap at the time (18p a spoke?). I think I got them from Spa or JE James, one of the shops that's bad at delivery, etc. It took a week or so to arrive (infuriating as it was the last thing to get the Bean up and running).

    That's a good point Snoops, especially for the rear (if you can't easily swap out spokes on your driveside).

  • If a spoke length calculator says 277.6 is there a range of spoke sizes I can use?

    I'm asking because the shop I was looking at only had 276s or 277s in stock.

  • Tough luck, Sandy... You're gonna have to get new hubs or rims, 0.4mm is way too much tolerance... Sorry...

  • That's just mean.
    I read that it's better to round down and never more than 1.8mm.

  • My recipe for strong polo wheels (in order of importance)

    1) wheelcovers - spreads the load of impacts, I've seen shitty 70s single-wall rims last ages when they've had covers
    2) strong rim - double wall, welded join, high-grade aluminium, deeper v sections mean higher tensions are possible.
    3) no-dish - equalised tension is especially important for sideways impacts. Wider center-to-flange measurements on your hubs help, but I don't know by how much.
    4)use 26" if possible.
    5)more spokes - my 32h wheels with all of the above have lasted way longer than my 48h, but all things being equal, more spokes are better.

    Hand building is usually better than machine building, but it depends on the hands and the machines. Also, I think a lot of people have different definitions of a strong wheel. I think a wheel is weak if it buckles more than 1-2mm and won't respond to truing, but some people I know think a wheel is strong if it goes 1-2cm out of true but doesn't collapse for a year or so.

  • Disagree, spoke count is way more important than no-dish, especially on a 700 when you want to keep playing after losing a few spokes.

    Wheel covers = heavy and don't protect a 32/36h in a crash situation (just stop balls and pedals breaking spokes) so I'd move that down too. I got through 32/36h wheels every couple of months (Open Pro, Sputnik, etc), but my 48h rims have lasted well over a year and are soon to be replaced from rim wear (no buckles, just a small amount of lateral).

  • if you have 26" wheels, 48h are overkill.

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Wheel building for polo

Posted by Avatar for Wicksie @Wicksie

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