3D printed bike

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  • http://inhabitat.com/3d-printed-air-bike­-is-as-strong-as-steel-but-13rd-the-weig­ht-of-aluminium/

    Hmm interesting. Looks belt driven, maybe fixed? cant see brakes..

    Pete

  • We have been observing this over the last few days at work.
    They have restricted themselves by using an SLS machine with a small build chamber, meaning the frame has to be made in sections which are the glued together. It will clearly fail at the joins in about 5 minutes.

    for some reason people have started to try and make SLS printed products, which is just retarded. 3D printing is a way of producing a prototype quickly (rapid prototyping)...... using it to produce a final product is just plain stupid, and rediculously expensive. You could buy a top end carbon road bike with SRAM Red for less than it would have cost to produce that peice of crap.

    And the presenter on the BBC news peice crashed it as soon as he went off camera.

  • I don't really respect Inhabitat. I felt like when they launched that blog, they got a lot of recognition because the founder is married to the founder of Engadget and some other tech blogs. The journalistic quality seems low and they just reek of greenwashing rather than actual substance. I haven't read it in a while though, so they may have got better. And no, I don't feel like churning through the last few years worth of their posts to find evidence; I'm just sayin'.

  • What do they mean printed air?

  • I saw this a couple of days ago in the bbc news site. explained okish here http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-12664422
    I would like to see more of the bike in motion tho, as it seems fucking loud!

  • damn what was that noise? Didnt realise it used bearings of the same material aswell, maybe he noise is to do with that.

    Thanks for that link xanderh

  • Dibs on 3d printed spok!

  • I want it in rattlecan gold

  • Repost

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-12664422

    Repost? Nylon bike as strong as steel. Looks like pish. Cracked me up the sound at the end. Giving it all "This is world class british engineering" then gets on and rides it and it sounds like a dolphin's fart.

    plus MERGEMERGEMERGEMEREGEGEMEER

    I don't mean to dump all over the OP, but we really don't need a new thread for every graphic designer who decides he wants to revolutionise the bicycle.

    Most of it is here http://bicycledesign.net/ anyway...

  • In a way, I think you're all missing the point. Making that bike was not an attempt to design a better bike, it was essentially a PR move by the company to get noticed. (not advocating, just saying)

    Also, the tech involved may one day be useful to 'print' whole consumer level product.

    meh. the bike did look like shit

    this is much more interesting... blow molded frames anyone?

    http://www.gizmag.com/new-material-steel­-plastic/18013/

  • ^ yeah. I understand that it's just a prototyping device (I've used one at my university workshop actually, it's amazing to watch), but I can see some real consumer demand for things like that when the technology becomes better and more affordable. I guess the printers might one day have different powders that can replicate many materials, so even complex multi-material objects could be printed; printable electronics are perfectly feasible. Imagine downloading the plans for a new computer and just printing one off!

  • We have been observing this over the last few days at work.
    They have restricted themselves by using an SLS machine with a small build chamber, meaning the frame has to be made in sections which are the glued together. It will clearly fail at the joins in about 5 minutes.

    for some reason people have started to try and make SLS printed products, which is just retarded. 3D printing is a way of producing a prototype quickly (rapid prototyping)...... using it to produce a final product is just plain stupid, and rediculously expensive. You could buy a top end carbon road bike with SRAM Red for less than it would have cost to produce that peice of crap.

    And the presenter on the BBC news peice crashed it as soon as he went off camera.

    I think most people have a very basic understanding of what 3D printing can achieve. I work in the aerospace industry, an industry that has used rapid prototyping for years. Now however, the system has gone from rapid prototyping to rapid manufacture.

    For example, the link below shows some of the more advanced manufacturing techniques going….

    YouTube - DMLS in action by Morris Technologies

    There are a range of methods of 3D printing, and new ones allow you to print a number of materials at the same time. So you can have one side of an object to be Titanium and the other side to be Magnesium, without a weld.

    Also, if you don’t have welds or joints you don’t have stress conentrations which are almost always the point of failure. So once the tech gets a lot better, you may well be able to print a whole frame without any joints. Also given the fact that it could be made from a number of materials (maybe even a mixture of metals and plastics) you could tailor the frame to have properties you want. Such as, stiff front end and a more compliant rear. The options are enormous.

    The technology is still in its infancy.

    Also, think of it this way…. huge companies such as Rolls Royce are investing very heavily in this technology. And they have spent a lot of time and money on seeing if its going to be worth their while.

    So saying “for some reason people have started to try and make SLS printed products, which is just retarded” just shows how little you know about the manufacturing technique and what it can deliver.

    Also, the cost is actually not that high. As there is no waste you only use what you need. You get almost 100% use from your material.

    A while ago I saw a titanium femur joint being manufactured. It was solid Ti at the ball of the joint and the rest of it got more and more porous which means the bone would grow into it. So after a while it would be a perfect joint. Amazing stuff.

  • 3D printed bike looks like a swan

  • ^ yeah. I understand that it's just a prototyping device (I've used one at my university workshop actually, it's amazing to watch), but I can see some real consumer demand for things like that when the technology becomes better and more affordable. I guess the printers might one day have different powders that can replicate many materials, so even complex multi-material objects could be printed; printable electronics are perfectly feasible. Imagine downloading the plans for a new computer and just printing one off!

    This can already be done, with metals anyway. You basically have an ion gun for the metal you are using. And you spray it where you want it. If I can remeber who makes these I will post

  • sorry to post so many, but this one is pretty amazing.

    YouTube - Trumpf - Direct Metal Deposition

  • I think most people have a very basic understanding of what 3D printing can achieve. I work in the aerospace industry, an industry that has used rapid prototyping for years. Now however, the system has gone from rapid prototyping to rapid manufacture.

    For example, the link below shows some of the more advanced manufacturing techniques going….

    YouTube - DMLS in action by Morris Technologies

    There are a range of methods of 3D printing, and new ones allow you to print a number of materials at the same time. So you can have one side of an object to be Titanium and the other side to be Magnesium, without a weld.

    Also, if you don’t have welds or joints you don’t have stress conentrations which are almost always the point of failure. So once the tech gets a lot better, you may well be able to print a whole frame without any joints. Also given the fact that it could be made from a number of materials (maybe even a mixture of metals and plastics) you could tailor the frame to have properties you want. Such as, stiff front end and a more compliant rear. The options are enormous.

    The technology is still in its infancy.

    Also, think of it this way…. huge companies such as Rolls Royce are investing very heavily in this technology. And they have spent a lot of time and money on seeing if its going to be worth their while.

    So saying “for some reason people have started to try and make SLS printed products, which is just retarded” just shows how little you know about the manufacturing technique and what it can deliver.

    Also, the cost is actually not that high. As there is no waste you only use what you need. You get almost 100% use from your material.

    A while ago I saw a titanium femur joint being manufactured. It was solid Ti at the ball of the joint and the rest of it got more and more porous which means the bone would grow into it. So after a while it would be a perfect joint. Amazing stuff.

    I am aware of all this... its purely my opinion.
    I think the metal sintering could offer some great new manufacturing process'.

    What I'm saying, is that people are starting to use 3D printing purley because they can, not because they need too. Like this bike, for example. 100% pointless with the current technolgy. Why would you spend that amount of money making a bike that is taking several steps back in bike design.

    You are taking what i said out of context. I was refering to this stupid bike, and the all the other pointless products that are being 3d printed at the moment, purely because they can, not because it makes the product better in any way, or cheaper to produce... quite the opposite in fact.

    You summed it up, the options are indeed enormous, but the technology still has a long way to go.
    trying to make a working bike with the currect technology, is like trying to teach a six year old to drive.... possible, but pretty pointless.

  • using it to produce a final product is just plain stupid,

    Not too sure how this is out of context really.

    The reason that the bike was made like this is...

    "The application is to prove that you can get the combination of weight and strength, which is vital in aerospace, and apply it so something that everyone can see and ride on." Robin Southwell, Chief Exec, EADS UK.

    They are not here to make a bike. They are to show the public what can be done. Then you can show an MP who knows nothing about manufacturing and then they invest in the UK manufacturing industry. You show them a cone-spinner for a turbo-prop and they say "errrr, whats that?" just like you would.

  • We have been observing this over the last few days at work.
    They have restricted themselves by using an SLS machine with a small build chamber, meaning the frame has to be made in sections which are the glued together. It will clearly fail at the joins in about 5 minutes.

    for some reason people have started to try and make SLS printed products, which is just retarded. 3D printing is a way of producing a prototype quickly (rapid prototyping)...... using it to produce a final product is just plain stupid, and rediculously expensive. You could buy a top end carbon road bike with SRAM Red for less than it would have cost to produce that peice of crap.

    And the presenter on the BBC news peice crashed it as soon as he went off camera.

    "restricted themselves"??? You can't go much bigger than 700mm at the moment with SLS and if its 'welded' correctly it will be quite strong. But to get the strength its going to weigh a ton.

    You would be surprised at the amount of companies that use SLS for some of their products and it is defiantly not retarded. Do you know how much injection moulding tools cost!!!?? Obviously not, using SLS companies can go straight to manufacture without the middle man in china. Which for small companies making small batches that are constantly changing its perfect.

    Mostly design and very expensive but these guys make cool stuff using sls..

    http://www.freedomofcreation.com/

    I think most people have a very basic understanding of what 3D printing can achieve. I work in the aerospace industry, an industry that has used rapid prototyping for years. Now however, the system has gone from rapid prototyping to rapid manufacture.

    For example, the link below shows some of the more advanced manufacturing techniques going….

    YouTube - DMLS in action by Morris Technologies

    There are a range of methods of 3D printing, and new ones allow you to print a number of materials at the same time. So you can have one side of an object to be Titanium and the other side to be Magnesium, without a weld.

    Also, if you don’t have welds or joints you don’t have stress conentrations which are almost always the point of failure. So once the tech gets a lot better, you may well be able to print a whole frame without any joints. Also given the fact that it could be made from a number of materials (maybe even a mixture of metals and plastics) you could tailor the frame to have properties you want. Such as, stiff front end and a more compliant rear. The options are enormous.

    The technology is still in its infancy.

    Also, think of it this way…. huge companies such as Rolls Royce are investing very heavily in this technology. And they have spent a lot of time and money on seeing if its going to be worth their while.

    So saying “for some reason people have started to try and make SLS printed products, which is just retarded” just shows how little you know about the manufacturing technique and what it can deliver.

    Also, the cost is actually not that high. As there is no waste you only use what you need. You get almost 100% use from your material.

    A while ago I saw a titanium femur joint being manufactured. It was solid Ti at the ball of the joint and the rest of it got more and more porous which means the bone would grow into it. So after a while it would be a perfect joint. Amazing stuff.

    +1

    The joint that you saw might have been something to do with within lots of medical companies are getting excited about it.

  • Also, if you don’t have welds or joints you don’t have stress conentrations which are almost always the point of failure. So once the tech gets a lot better, you may well be able to print a whole frame without any joints. Also given the fact that it could be made from a number of materials (maybe even a mixture of metals and plastics) you could tailor the frame to have properties you want. Such as, stiff front end and a more compliant rear. The options are enormous.

    I think you're essentially right, but I feel it's worth pointing out that that welds/ joints are not the only cause of stress concentrations, so what you're saying is incorrect. Also, it is already possible to have a stiff front end and compliant rear. Geometry can vary the stiffness of the component and create stress risers all of its own.

  • They are to show the public what can be done. Then you can show an MP who knows nothing about manufacturing and then they invest in the UK manufacturing industry.

    That is fucked up. :-(

    Don't want to live in a world where stuff is funded according to the whims of ignorant people.

  • "restricted themselves"??? You can't go much bigger than 700mm at the moment with SLS.

    Do you know how much injection moulding tools cost!!!??

    We recently had a part SLA printed that was a touch under 1200mm at it's largest dimension.

    Producing an injection mould is expensive, but is a one off cost.... Producing and SLS/SLA is also expensive, and costs the same for every reproduction.

  • I think you're essentially right, but I feel it's worth pointing out that that welds/ joints are not the only cause of stress concentrations, so what you're saying is incorrect. Also, it is already possible to have a stiff front end and compliant rear. Geometry can vary the stiffness of the component and create stress risers all of its own.

    I was saying that stress concentrations are almost always the cause of failure. I think this is pretty much correct. I know geometry can cause them too, but welds will have horrible residual thermal stresses and any mechanical join will have similar peak stresses.

  • I count way more than 6 parts.

    it looks like a bag of shite.

    next!

  • That is fucked up. :-(

    Don't want to live in a world where stuff is funded according to the whims of ignorant people.

    What's the alternative? We hand over the funding decisions to the commercial sector directly? "Just pay yourselves what you think is fair"?

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3D printed bike

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