On One Pompino owners...

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  • Isn't that a cotic fork?

  • Don't suppose you know why they have it on the other side than every other fork?

  • Our ROADHOG forks caused a bit of a stir when they were released to
    compliment our ROADRAT frame. Why? Well, as you can see from the
    photo, the disc mount is positioned on the front right of the fork
    rather than the more usual left rear. As always with Cotic products,
    there were firm engineering reasons for Our ROADHOG forks caused a bit
    of a stir when they were released to compliment our ROADRAT frame.
    Why? Well, as you can see from the photo, the disc mount is positioned
    on the front right of the fork rather than the more usual left rear.
    As always with Cotic products, there were firm engineering reasons for
    placing it where it is, and here's the lowdown:

    Forces Axle movement under disc braking is now a fairly well known
    phenomenon in mountain biking. Basically with the caliper positioned
    left rear (usual place), and a vertical dropout, there is a reaction
    of the braking force which tends to push the axle out of the dropout,
    hence you're relying on the friction of your QR to counteract this
    rather than a completely mechanical stop. Most manufacturers have
    moved to a slightly forward facing dropout to counteract this.

    We've actually never experienced any trouble with this on our mountain
    bikes, but during prototype testing of the ROADHOG fork - which had
    the disc mount in the usual left rear position - we did actually
    experience some axle movement. Nothing actually came undone, but after
    some serious downhill braking on fast roads, the rotors would be
    rubbing a touch and the wheel would 'clunk' home in the dropout when
    we undid the axle nuts. This was clearly unacceptable, so we set about
    finding a solution. Our first port of call was forward facing
    dropouts, but these would have required custom cut version which would
    have increased the fork cost disproportionately. Therefore the design
    problem became how to contain the disc forces whilst using an off the
    shelf vertical dropout. The solution, as you can see, was to place the
    disc mounting on the front. This puts all the forces into the dropout,
    and is still a completely normal International Standard setup, so it
    takes any IS caliper. It also gets the brake away from the back of the
    fork which brings us to.... it where it is, and here's the lowdown:

    Forces Axle movement under disc braking is now a fairly well known
    phenomenon in mountain biking. Basically with the caliper positioned
    left rear (usual place), and a vertical dropout, there is a reaction
    of the braking force which tends to push the axle out of the dropout,
    hence you're relying on the friction of your QR to counteract this
    rather than a completely mechanical stop. Most manufacturers have
    moved to a slightly forward facing dropout to counteract this.

    We've actually never experienced any trouble with this on our mountain
    bikes, but during prototype testing of the ROADHOG fork - which had
    the disc mount in the usual left rear position - we did actually
    experience some axle movement. Nothing actually came undone, but after
    some serious downhill braking on fast roads, the rotors would be
    rubbing a touch and the wheel would 'clunk' home in the dropout when
    we undid the axle nuts. This was clearly unacceptable, so we set about
    finding a solution. Our first port of call was forward facing
    dropouts, but these would have required custom cut version which would
    have increased the fork cost disproportionately. Therefore the design
    problem became how to contain the disc forces whilst using an off the
    shelf vertical dropout. The solution, as you can see, was to place the
    disc mounting on the front. This puts all the forces into the dropout,
    and is still a completely normal International Standard setup, so it
    takes any IS caliper. It also gets the brake away from the back of the
    fork which brings us to....

  • Would you consider selling the pompino with original fork and possible v brakes
    Please PM me
    Also have a carbon alu Boardman tk pro that I would happily exchange

  • not sure he would want to exchange if the reason he is selling is that his wife is complaining he has too many bikes

  • Looks ace! What fork is that?

  • some china carbon with alu steerer, "housebrand" from a german mailorder bought a few years ago

  • this looks nice!!

  • what gear ratios are we all running on our Pompino’s ?

  • 42 x 17

    For London riding, a little high I'd say

  • I’m on 38 x 17 Seemed a good ratio for Forest riding but a little low on the road

  • 38x19 for cross

  • 46 x 17, could make my life a bit easier and get a 42

    Also some of you may remember the awful pomp on eBay earlier this year, scatter paint, light up bollocks etc

    Needless to say I have saved it from its former life

  • Anyone got a spare one of these in small size?

  • Tell me you’re not repainting it?!

  • He just did it. That’s the result of it!

  • Ah ok, doh!

    @packet great job, looks banging.

  • pretty sure thats how it came, unless he has repainted it exactly like it was before

  • Nah not repainted, just stripped and cleaned it, have built it up just need to photograph it ;-)

  • My Pompino is kind of a rat, but it will get worse. I´m bulding a Steamroller of the nice parts and will build the Pompino with stuff that people dont want steal.


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    • IMG_0288.jpg
  • I'm after an XL pomp if anyone has one laying about, rattier/cheaper the better

  • I got a ratty fork, but no frame.

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On One Pompino owners...

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