Great visual indicators of how to occupy a lane

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  • Just found these:
    http://roadwarrior.andyrutledge.com/2010­/06/riding-in-traffic/

    They're great visuals of where you should be and why it works. Unfortunately made for US roads (wrong side), so perhaps we can produce a series of visuals that work for UK roads.

  • Good old primary position

    One of the graphics bods might be able to help.

  • Here you go...


    2 Attachments

    • lanes_danger.jpg
    • lanes_better.jpg
  • It should be noted that there is some disagreement as to how to accurately describe the primary position, as it obviously changes when you pass a parked car, etc. I think it's important to describe it as relative to other traffic, not to the kerb or other fixed markings. My favourite formulation is 'just to the right of the left-hand tyre tracks' (and vice versa for the US etc.). But, as I say, there is some disagreement.

  • Do not let Nowhere Fast see these, it's for his own good.

  • Oh, I was using that handy white line found in the middle of the road.

    Is that not the primary position?

  • Merging the lanes?

  • The primary position is better than missionary.

  • Or secondary.

  • Could change the text to 'drivers should' rather than 'Drivers will', thisislondon etc etc

  • You mean, drivers will honk/try to overtake anyway

  • It should be noted that there is some disagreement as to how to accurately describe the primary position, as it obviously changes when you pass a parked car, etc. I think it's important to describe it as relative to other traffic, not to the kerb or other fixed markings. My favourite formulation is 'just to the right of the left-hand tyre tracks' (and vice versa for the US etc.). But, as I say, there is some disagreement.

    there is probably more agreement that the best place for any road user to see and be seen is the middle of the lane in another road user's line of sight. where the risk of surprising them is minimised and ther're are less likely to overtake. You'd think that is where you'd find the more vulnerable road users so people can look out for them

    yes they may honk clockwork killa so keep an eye on them and honking is ok ,they're still not all used to seeing cyclists in front of them ....yet .

    as more riders ride in the middle of the lane (which is necessary most of the time in the 20mph zone that is inner london and not hard ) drivers'll begin to realise that it's easier to hang back

    Yet there aren't enough images showing cyclists riding in the middle of the lane. Shame the TfL ads, posters etc didn't show cyclists riding in the traffic stream on an A road instead of those models in airbrushville

    I had always thought that there should be a road sign that looks like queues likely

    a person on a bike in between 2 cars *=cyclists take the lane. *Tower bridge would be a good place for the sign, Whiteman road in haringey, places where riders would be much safer in the middle of the lane and safer when drivers expect/accept /encourage it. some advocacy groups (LCC, CTC) are campaigning for a tweak in the liability law that would really encourage this behaviour

  • The measurement may not be easy for most of the cyclists to figure out, something like "nearer to the middle of the lane" would make more sense, or 'near the centre of the lane'.

  • Yet there aren't enough images showing cyclists riding in the middle of the lane. Shame the TfL ads, posters etc didn't show cyclists riding in the traffic stream on an A road instead of those models in airbrushville

    I had always thought that there should be a road sign that looks like queues likely

    I think I figure out why they didn't impended this - they'd be contradicting themselves due to the cycle lane putting cyclists at risk by encouraging them to ride in the gutter.

  • @Skydancer,
    why is Rob Brydon in this photo? (dont expect you to answer that)
    bizarre...
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/2097872.st­m

  • That story is eight years old and Rob Byrdon was playing the mini cab driver in the series Marion and Geoff at the time. He generally looked a bit down in the mouth so......

  • you are the font of all knowledge mr Wigan !

  • I don't like how the gap is exaggerated on the second picture though, if what they are saying is true (which i'm not disagreeing with) there shouldn't be a need for it. Makes the information given a little less believable imo.

  • there is probably more agreement that the best place for any road user to see and be seen is the middle of the lane in another road user's line of sight. where the risk of surprising them is minimised and ther're are less likely to overtake. You'd think that is where you'd find the more vulnerable road users so people can look out for them

    I still prefer to say 'just to the right of the left-hand tyre track' rather than 'middle of the lane', as it takes care of cases where you go around parked cars, for instance. It's defined in relation to dynamic traffic, not to static infrastructure. It makes making eye contact with drivers behind easier. There are of course cases where it's advisable to be further towards the right, and certainly at pinch-points, at certain junctions, or in narrow lanes.

    #teachinggrannyskydancertosuckeggs

  • The problem with tyre track is that some are not as visible as other, so it's not always a good way of showing how to ride on the road.

  • It doesn't refer to visible skid marks or anything, but to the track the tyres of a car would and do take.

  • optimum positioning and so many other factors that come together while riding vary so much which is why National Standard training, as opposed to cycling proficiency, rarely refers to specific measurements (apart from car door width) . Dynamic risk management is key reacting to a changing situation and understanding some principles will help make these decisions constantly and (eventually) instinctively

    eg
    How long do you look back for?
    Depends
    How often do you look behind?
    Whenever you don't know what's there so you're not surprised
    How long do you hold a signal for? Until its been seen
    Where does a cyclist ride in the lane? depends on many factors. Lane width, traffic speed, your speed, your skills and confidence, hazards such as parked cars, sideroads...

    Cycle Trainers put their clients in a variety of situations and risk asses with them possibilities

  • Speaking of visual, check out my gal Keri's video clips:
    http://vimeo.com/14273330

  • Im guessing they edited away the honking?

    Id be scared to ride on a busy road like that in the USA. Seems just like riding on busy A roads, which ive done but felt on a kinfes edge.

  • You should try reading 'Effective Cycling' by John Franklin before you go there, then.

    Nice video.

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Great visual indicators of how to occupy a lane

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