Does anyone know anything about gardening?

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  • It is indeed sycamore. I assume you just have lots of seedlings from a near by tree. They should be easy enough to pull up by hand if they're less than a 6 months old... I probably wouldn't wait though.

  • I have 2 massive sycamores in my garden, the seedlings have been very successful this year. I spend most of my spare time endlessly pulling the buggers up.

  • Anyone get weed grasses...
    Have loads on my lawn this year, should I pull them up or just leave?

    G

  • find a use for all the cherries

    I don’t think that will be a problem—rather the bird feeders will be surplus to requirements for a week or two, immediately before the cherries are ripe enough for humans.

  • That would be fine with me. I like birds more than rotten cherries. There's a cardinal family that hangs out in this tree like they own it.

  • Not that I've noticed, Oak, birch, eucalyptus, but maybe I've missed one.

  • If no tree nearby a clutch of seeds may have just blown in. Just pull them all out, easy when they're small.

  • This Ash tree has managed to sneakily grow in my garden


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  • The ton of pea shingle I used in our greenhouse base was riddled with acorns, the buggers are sprouting all over the shop.

  • Sycamore chat has answered the mystery of what the was sprouting up through my lawn, cheers

  • Fuckers are everywhere here. There are even a couple of 20-30 year old trees that the previous owner just ignored from seedlings. Seem to fair better than the grass seed I paid good money for!

  • There's currently an inaccessible sycamore tree growing between a brick garage and my driveway wall. It will shortly become accessible when it knocks the wall down...

  • Okay maybe weird but whatever.... I have never seen this before.

    Look what I found in the veggies nthis morning


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  • Now you know how baby earthworms are made!

  • Chilli’s? Never thought about sticking them in a bed.

  • the near one is a jalapeño... the other one is a sweet pepper. there's another pepper out of view.

    but anyway why not? they love the raised bed with loose well drained soil.

  • but anyway why not?

    Just never occurred to me I guess, when they’re in pots I can keep them in sunny spots and then move them if the weather takes a drastic turn for the worse. Lucky to have a greenhouse for the first time this year so I’m hoping they’ll really love it.
    Something new I heard on GW last night was Monty saying it’s best to constrain the roots in a not too large pot, more fruit less bush apparently, but it’s probably marginal gains, getting the watering/feeding right is more important I’m sure.

  • Hey all - anyone have any recommendations for a small solar-powered irrigation system controller? Only got a small garden with a few beds, so not after something fancy; but equally not too cheap that it'll break within a year.

    Alternatively any reliable hacks that will survive a few weeks away?

    Cheers

  • Something new I heard on GW last night was Monty saying it’s best to constrain the roots in a not too large pot, more fruit less bush apparently, but it’s probably marginal gains, getting the watering/feeding right is more important I’m sure.

    This does not make any sense to me at all to be honest.

    If starting chili plants indoors you'd probably use small-ish pots due to lack of space, but my experience is they love it when you give them the largest possible pot as soon as possible!
    In other words: what they don't like is to start flowering / producing berries when the light increases - and then experiencing lack of space / light / water / nutrients, also re-potting them when they're in that stage gives the more fragile varieties transplant shock, so again - best to move them to a large container before they really start to flower.

    The bigger the pot (and the more light / water / nutrients, within reason) the bigger the plant.
    The more sun and heat the more hot the chilies 🔥

    Ps: in case you guys aren't aware - we do have a chili thread on here !

  • I expect with a larger pot it's easier to mess up the watering, but yeah I was always under the impression that the bigger the pot the bigger the bush and the more bountiful the harvest

  • I expect with a larger pot it's easier to mess up the watering

    Not really, no.
    Just make sure there are drainage holes / stones at the bottom etc. as their roots don't like to sit in water.
    It's completely ok to let the soil get dry inbetween waterings (hanging leaves show you it's time to water again), so basically with bigger pots you just need to water less often, like with tomatoes etc.

  • If you only have one zone to control, this is ridiculously cheap and from a good brand. I have their two zone programmable and it hasn't missed a beat in three years.

    It's not solar powered, but the 9v battery will last for ages!

    https://www.greenhousepeople.co.uk/produ­cts/3390/aquauno-pratico-8493-timer/

  • I've always grown my chillies in a raised bed and had no issues with lack of fruit.

  • I was thinking more about how it can be tough to get the water to reach all of the compost sometimes in a large pot

  • Well it kinda depends on how big a pot you're talking about, but what you'd ideally want to do is have a big bowl / tray / container with water that has been sitting in it for a while, with a water level somewhat below the height of your pot(s), and then you put the chili plants in there and let them soak up the water.
    That way you don't flush any nutrients out of the soil and give it a chance to soak up nicely.
    If that's not an option I usually give them just a little bit of water first (which will "open up" the dry soil) and then a big gulp an hour or so later..

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Does anyone know anything about gardening?

Posted by Avatar for carson @carson

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