Useful Cycle Training Books

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  • ^ from what you've written it suggests filtering on left is not best practice, but also not something that should be addressed as a never-ever technique.

    Usual comments about assessing local conditions and risk at time of decision making - i.e. Do i / we filter left or not right here and now - apply. Common sense really, no?

  • common sense doesn't always work which is why training helps. People using common sense filter left until an instructor talks them through a risk assessment of the manouvre listing the hazards of passing left verses the hazards of offside filtering.

    "Never-ever" is never helpful. -In most instances there are fewer hazards passing on the offside

  • Agreed.

    Sometimes there are more hazards on the right.

    Where do we stand as instructors regarding our insurance if we do filter on the left with trainees or drill them on the left. Is it down to our dynamic risk assessment? Or should we never-ever have trainees filter on the left?

  • do you meen filtering with a group-snaking?
    if so don't filter with a group. wait in the queue

    if during a 1 to 1 lesson then this is a discussion point and based on your risk assessment

  • Not with a group.

    With individuals, either in paired riding or drilling them.

    Filtering on the left would be OK if the situation passed risk assessment?

  • yes
    However trainees need you to legitimise to them that passing right is often better so i would be sure to include that in lessons

  • Good point. I always discuss what hazards there are passing on left or right before we do it. It is surprising how many trainees think it is not permitted to filter on the right, there alone that it might be the safer side to do this.

  • Plus filtering down the centre if there are two separate lines of traffic.
    Isn't filtering, and the dynamic decisions involved in it, the perfect example of why cycle training is something you have to do rather than just read about?

  • Filtering is a good reason and even the basics (like how best to signal) sometimes need to be discussed
    http://www.lfgss.com/post1817513-135.htm­l

  • +1 Filtering centre is another choice

    All the L3 stuff brings dynamic risk assessment to the fore, IMO.
    Enabling trainees to make more effective dynamic risk assessments.

  • Can you quote the manual with a page reference ShanonBall ?

    As far as I remember passing on the left of a traffic queue is not generally recommended an exception would be where there is a lot room on the left (or when there is a dedicated left filter)

    7(g), p106-107. Paragraph in question, top of p107

  • 7(g), p106-107. Paragraph in question, top of p107

    Thanks for that mark.
    It fits in with what we've said above. Teach passing right as the least risk option generally and on journey accompaniments there may be situations where left filtering is low risk . It is, as you suggested, based on dynamic risk assessment of each situation

  • common sense doesn't always work which is why training helps. People using common sense filter left until an instructor talks them through a risk assessment of the manouvre listing the hazards of passing left verses the hazards of offside filtering.

    "Never-ever" is never helpful. -In most instances there are fewer hazards passing on the offside

    I find writing answers without more than one interpretation tricky... by common sense i mean't for trainers thinking about left filtering - i.e. Discuss with trainee the risks, their need to risk assess each situ etc - and did not mean to infer that filtering itself is a matter of common sense.

  • I found The Art of Cycling by Robert Hurst illuminating and I would be interested to hear what other people think of it. I thought the emphasis on attentiveness was correct and the book showed a proper interest in road surfaces, which led to one really good teaching point - the first thing you do before looking behind is look ahead.
    Overall, Hurst argues for cyclists taking complete personal responsibility for their ride. This implies that you cannot ever unthinkingly rely on any manoeuvre or regulation or technique - he is arguing against doctrinaire lane takers and those who over sell the efficacy of making eye contact. One corollary of his position is that since the artful cyclist knows that other road users will make mistakes, there is no point getting particularly irate - much better to put your available psychic energy into self reflection and possibly review your route planning if the issues are frequent.

    One issue that I am not aware any training books cover well is cycling with lots of other cyclists - Franklin in particular seems to have in mind a single and lonely cyclist. For those who have too much spare time, do check the front brake cable route on the Cyclecraft cover below. I know that these covers are staged but it adds to my personal difficulty in constructing a convincing picture of John Franklin actually cycling.

  • AFAICS Hurst is arguing against some kind of caricature view of "vehicular cycling" (aka "Cyclecraft cycling", "British Standards cycling", "Bikeability cycling", "Effective Cycling" etc).

    This stems from the social psychological situation in the US that has cycling advocates adopting a vehement anti-correct-cycling stance, quite a opposite of what you have in Britain today.

    Here's John Forester's review of Hurst's book: http://www.johnforester.com/Articles/Soc­ial/Hursts%20Art.pdf

    BTW Forester's "Effective Cycling" has an extensive coverage of group riding.

  • Hurst's "The Art of Cycling" is very readable - informative without being drearily, didactic. It's not a best practice text, but it does make you think differently about how you ride. If anyone wants to borrow a copy, pm me.

  • Thanks Chainwhip for the link to review. JF clearly has some fun with the lack of engineering rigour in Hurst's book. these faults were much more evident in the Cyclists Manifesto. I don't know about the arguments amongst US cycling advocacy but what Hurst says about cyclist behaviours chimes with what I see and read in the UK. For me, reading the book felt like an advance or at least a confirmation of my own theory and experience.
    You may have seen this but maybe others haven't - John Forester speaking at Google HQ and not winning many converts, I think; some spectacular dogmatic nonsense on Dutch cycling also:
    http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=­-6082181397382918705#

  • have now got all 4 B.C Bikeability instructors books,
    gonna be plundering them for fresh exercises to try out.

  • Brilliant, going to be interesting to read those.

  • have now got all 4 B.C Bikeability instructors books,
    gonna be plundering them for fresh exercises to try out.

    I just tried to find them on the BC website - with the usual result when I try to find anything on there. Can you give me a hint please?

  • yeah i know what you mean about that website, its like the black hole.
    Not sure if these resourses will be commonly available, similar to the 'gears' workbooks for sport cycling, they are part of course materials, so they likely to be cagey with them. will start to become more freely available as more people get trained by b.c
    so sorry to carp on about something thats not available.

  • Oh well, thanks anyway. I really like the 'Gears' books and hoped for something similar. I'll have to bend someones ear in Coaching & Education to see if I can get them.

  • Cycle Training UK has just published the Cycling Games Compendium (Purchased from the online publising service Lulu.com)

    *CTUK’s Cycling Games Compendium contains a mixture of cooperative and competitive games that can be played on bicycles. These are suitable for people of all ages, in fact, for anyone who wishes to have fun on bikes while improving their bike skills. This all colour book contains photographs diagrams and text showing how to play these games with the minimum of risk.This is an excellent resource for teaching National Standard Level 1.


    *

  • nice. any bulk buy offers?

  • nice. any bulk buy offers?

    tap up Sustrans for a copy for all BIOS,?
    then again with teammeal out recently being burger and chips maybe not...

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Useful Cycle Training Books

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