Ways not to lock your bike

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  • They have that rule at my local university campus. Whats annoying is that the stands are weak as piss and really old fashioned. They are also not very well distributed across the very large campus. They actually come and angle grind.

    That sucks. Surely illegal though?

  • That sucks. Surely illegal though?

    'bikes locked here will be removed' signs are all over the place. If it was illegal to do so surely that makes them pointless?

  • I remember there's a law in a different country that stated you're not allowed to lock your bicycles to any street furniture unless there's a bicycle stand.

    I can't remember which country that is though, it's in Europe I think.

    They have that rule at my local university campus.

    West Midlands.

  • unless the signs work well enough as a deterrent?

    It should be illegal.

    #notalawyer

  • interesting. Hmm...

  • First post, and my beater looks so bad people are more likely to steal my lock.

  • Lidl are currently selling angle grinders for £30. also a car jack an wheel wrench for £19.
    Basically, thieves can get their kicks from cars and bikes in Nottingham for a round £50.

  • Lidl sell angle grinders!?
    This is the start of some kind of distopian film where gangs of PCP smoking skinhead girls armed with Primark knives and Lidl angle grinders terrorise preening trendies and young professionals.

  • It wasn't near the Gare du Nord at all - and I'm pretty sure I saw other bikes chained up to other lamposts/'street furniture'.

    Maybe it varies by arrondissement...
    I park my scooter on the big pavement thing when I pick people up. Don't think the rules vary with arrondissement. If you avoid stationnement genant (blocking the pavement, being in the way etc) then you're usually fine.

  • 'bikes locked here will be removed' signs are all over the place. If it was illegal to do so surely that makes them pointless?

    Not if you're scared into locking up somewhere else

  • This is the start of some kind of distopian film where gangs of PCP smoking skinhead girls armed with Primark knives and Lidl angle grinders terrorise preening trendies and young professionals.

    Please tell me when that goes to DVD.

  • 'bikes locked here will be removed' signs are all over the place. If it was illegal to do so surely that makes them pointless?

    Actually I don't think there is a law that signs can't lie, at least there isn't in England. Next door to where I work there is a roman wall with a door way in it which basically means it's a right of way. The hotel who's grounds you have to walk through don't like this so they've put up "this is not a right of way, and may be closed" signs. This is a lie, but as long as they don't lock the gates at either end of the walk way (at least if they don't do it for long enough for a court order) then it doesn't matter and it probably lessons the traffic (non motorised) through their grounds.

  • Actually I don't think there is a law that signs can't lie, at least there isn't in England. Next door to where I work there is a roman wall with a door way in it which basically means it's a right of way. The hotel who's grounds you have to walk through don't like this so they've put up "this is not a right of way, and may be closed" signs. This is a lie, but as long as they don't lock the gates at either end of the walk way (at least if they don't do it for long enough for a court order) then it doesn't matter and it probably lessons the traffic (non motorised) through their grounds.

    Just because there's a door it doesn't mean it's officially a public right of way.
    The sign is normally there in case someone tries to get it made a public right of way in the future based on convention.

  • Took this back in Austin, TX. Pretty easy to get your bike taken from under you there, friend of a friend was riding his bmx home from work at 2am and got knocked off by a car, when he woke up the bmx and his wallet was gone, thinks they hit him to rob him.
    Anyway, I guess these thieves really wanted this hub.

  • The other day in Hyde Park, right next to the Winter Wonderland.

  • Actually I don't think there is a law that signs can't lie, at least there isn't in England. Next door to where I work there is a roman wall with a door way in it which basically means it's a right of way. The hotel who's grounds you have to walk through don't like this so they've put up "this is not a right of way, and may be closed" signs. This is a lie, but as long as they don't lock the gates at either end of the walk way (at least if they don't do it for long enough for a court order) then it doesn't matter and it probably lessons the traffic (non motorised) through their grounds.

    Im thinking in particular about signs that say 'bikes will be removed'. If your bike is illegally taken by the business owner you could nail them for it, so Im guessing that it isn't illegal. I am not a lawyer, though.

  • unless of course it is a completely idle threat every time.

  • The other day in Hyde Park, right next to the Winter Wonderland.

    beautfiul photo.



  • 2 Attachments

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  • I used to park next to this guy often and I could not believe it when one day he did this!

  • Im thinking in particular about signs that say 'bikes will be removed'. If your bike is illegally taken by the business owner you could nail them for it, so Im guessing that it isn't illegal. I am not a lawyer, though.

    If you lock your bike up on private property, the owner can cut the lock and remove it without warning. There is a van which drives around canary wharf all day removing bikes which have been attached to railings and stuff. The bikes get donated to a charity which dismantles them and sells them to raise money for bikes in the developing world. It's totally legal and there's nothing you can do about it, as long as there are signs up somewhere which say something along the lines of "bicycles attached to these railings will be removed" then the attitude of the law is "you had fair warning, tough shit".

  • some would say that a small sign exclusively in english is not fair warning.

    for example, what if someone was blind, how would they know they weren't allowed to lock there?

  • Blind cyclists of the world unite!

  • i have a seething rage against companies that don't have bike racks (come on, not even one?!) just outside their building entrance. i don't know if i've missing something obvious. surely companies that don't have loading bays could either just have one u rack, or a little clip on their wall or something saying "bikes locked here longer than 15 minutes will be removed".

    raaaagggggggggeeeeeeee!

  • If you lock your bike up on private property, the owner can cut the lock and remove it without warning. There is a van which drives around canary wharf all day removing bikes which have been attached to railings and stuff. The bikes get donated to a charity which dismantles them and sells them to raise money for bikes in the developing world. It's totally legal and there's nothing you can do about it, as long as there are signs up somewhere which say something along the lines of "bicycles attached to these railings will be removed" then the attitude of the law is "you had fair warning, tough shit".

    They have to return it if you ask for it back. They have the right to remove the bike, but not to regard it as theirs. They are charge a reasonable fee for "admin" however.

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Ways not to lock your bike

Posted by Avatar for illbill @illbill

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