Android phones, apps and tablets

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  • :-/ I don't think I have duplicated stuff, how would I identify such "updatable" apps?

    If you go into:

    Settings > Apps

    And select an app.

    If the app says "Uninstall" then it hasn't duplicated itself.

    If the app says "Uninstall Updates" then it has duplicated itself.

    Anything shipped with the OS is definitely duplicated (Gmail, Maps, etc on regular Android, things like Facebook and Samsung on a Galazy S3, etc).

    Anything installed but somehow declared as being special (some of Google apps, some of the weird printing services from HP and others) will also have duplicated themselves.

    It's a really messy thing to be honest. But I get why they do it. They want to be OTA update whilst keeping a workable system, allow you to remove a broken update and leave you with a working system.

    They also want to ship some functionality as packaged bundles (apps) to get around licensing issues (codecs, DRM, IP). So they separate it from the OS but yet it's critical for the phone to function. So some apps are marked as uninstallable regardless of what you say, and updates to them will be installed in addition to the original (which if removed would mean you could uninstall the updates and suddenly not have some core functionality... like voice codecs).

    The only way to give you this kind of assurance is to run the equivalence of Mac's Time Machine, or Windows System Restore.

    Except the way they do it in Android is very Linux-like... they simply put the new version in storage and update symlinks. Now you have twice the application you thought you did.

  • If you go into:

    Settings > Apps

    And select an app.

    If the app says "Uninstall" then it hasn't duplicated itself.

    If the app says "Uninstall Updates" then it has duplicated itself.

    Anything shipped with the OS is definitely duplicated (Gmail, Maps, etc on regular Android, things like Facebook and Samsung on a Galazy S3, etc).

    Anything installed but somehow declared as being special (some of Google apps, some of the weird printing services from HP and others) will also have duplicated themselves.

    First few I hit...
    "Uninstall"
    Drive
    Play Music

    "Uninstall Updates"
    Gmail
    Play Services

    Terms of GApps mean Cyanogenmod isn't permitted to distribute as part of the main installable, you have to download whichever gapps.zip suits your version.

  • Sure, but the way in which gappz.zip gets installed (via recovery), does make those core things have the same uninstallable state as regular Android.

    Which is why you cannot now uninstall Gmail and Play Services.

    And so every update to those will be a file system duplicate.

    My original point still stands, over a few years whatever the advertised and initial size of an OS, what is considered the OS will have grown.

    The only advantage with Cyanogen to reduce the likelihood of that, is that you are probably likely to wipe your phone and reinstall everything if it ever gets sluggish or you want to recover all your usable space and think that reinstalling is faster than pruning.

  • Hi, have UTFS and goggled but would like advice as well please.

    Does anyone use a wireless / bluetooth keyboard & mouse with their tablet?

    I need a mouse primarily for using remote desktop and citrix - when clicking on the little 'x' can be difficult with fat fingers.

    I am running a galaxy tab 2 note 10.1 and would like to avoid taking a laptop when I travel as it is only for small tasks that I need to use the keyboard and mouse.

  • [removed quote]

    i wipe the phone completely clean between updates and push them using ADB sideload or fastboot

    i know this is fairly aggressive from a user standpoint and so i understand why everyone doesn't do this... but I REALLY don't understand why manufacturers don't implement a one click USB update via computer which wipes the phone clean, pushes an update as a single install and then replaces photos and settings. When i do it manually it takes 15 minutes start to finish.

    OTA updates are ridiculous.

  • Sheesh, you quote that much for a one-line response?

    I've clearly referenced Samsung, HTC, Google phones, off the shelf, that will receive a number of updates to the system and core apps over the lifetime, and estimated the size based on real-world observations of that.

    None of the above is going to apply if you use AOSP (or another stripped-down mod) and instead of doing OTA updates, or having unremovable system apps, you just blow away the phone once a year.

    It should be pretty obvious. It's the difference between an Ubuntu install on a PC, and a Slackware user with a pared down build.

    But, for the average person, with the average Android, applying updates to everything over the life of the phone... you can reasonably expect that the size you should allow for the OS and all of those updates, duplicated apps, etc... to be in the order of multi-GB, and what I observed on the S3 we have is that 5GB isn't an unrealistic expectation.

    Of course, you, I, Emyr, and anyone else rooting and modding already isn't the average user.

  • happy?

  • He said rooting.

  • Happier :)

  • anyway some version of rooted pure AOSP is the way to go. personally using this:

    http://forum.xda-developers.com/nexus-4/­development/rom-nexus-5-experience-facto­ry-image-t2537932

    runs a peach

    but again when i'm on stock I still push the google images manually and i really can't understand why this technique isn't automated for the average user rather than using OTA updates.

  • Google dumping Motorola off to Lenovo for $3b

  • Google dumping Motorola off to Lenovo for $3b

    Lenovo are pretty dominant in smartphones in emerging markets.

    I really like their K900:
    http://shopap.lenovo.com/in/en/smartphon­es/k-series/index.html

    Shame it's not available in Europe... I probably would have gone for that over the Nexus 5. I have a thing for brushed metal and nice bolts.

    I think that's the whole point of Lenovo purchasing Motorola, they want to attack the US and European markets and they've seen Dell and other PC manufacturers fail before them. So buying Motorola, and their access to supply channels and a strong consumer brand, is a pretty good idea.

    Lenovo's strength is business targetted products, Motorola was always a workhorse there too.

  • Lenovo reportedly attempted to purchase BlackBerry, but a deal was supposedly squashed by regulators sensitive to a Chinese company owning phones widely used by government agencies.

    OT, but wonder if that might be the death knell for BB?

  • Lenovo are pretty dominant in smartphones in emerging markets.

    I really like their K900:
    http://shopap.lenovo.com/in/en/smartphon­es/k-series/index.html

    Shame it's not available in Europe... I probably would have gone for that over the Nexus 5. I have a thing for brushed metal and nice bolts.

    Amazon.com: Lenovo K900 Intel Dual Core 2.0GHz CPU Micro Sim 5.5" 1080p HD 13.0MP: Cell Phones & Accessories

  • On Ebay for £300 from UK sellers but yeah, warranty.

  • Yeah, but they targetted the radios at the emerging markets... GSM and 3G.

    When they make one for the European market and finish off that detail, it's on my "next phone" list.

  • Jesus that's a HUGE amount of lost cash

  • I think that's the whole point of Lenovo purchasing Motorola, they want to attack the US and European markets and they've seen Dell and other PC manufacturers fail before them. So buying Motorola, and their access to supply channels and a strong consumer brand, is a pretty good idea.

    Lenovo's strength is business targetted products, Motorola was always a workhorse there too.

    Motorola is a dead brand in anywhere other than the US these days and Lenovo already have the supply channels they need for smartphones.

    Motorola Mobility, the loss making rump that Google acquired, was the handset business. Motorola Solutions is, and was, the business focused part that was always profitable.

    The more I look at it, the less I understand Lenovo's reasoning. The only reason that makes sense is that it gives them some kind of benefit with Google that they can exploit in China.

  • Or it's part of a co-operation deal with Samsung that is rumoured to be in the pipeline that will see Google exit the devices market and share revenue;

    http://www.unwiredview.com/2014/01/30/go­ogle-and-samsung-are-working-on-wintel-l­ike-alliance-to-dominate-mobile-computin­g/

    That makes more sense.

  • closing of Nexus program in 2015

    urgh. Once again Samsung working to ruin android.

    Ah, actually sounds like there will still be 'google play edition' devices, so maybe not quite so bad

  • The problem with the Nexus range is that Google sell them at wafer thin margins, so anyone else seeking to do a mid-range Android device can't compete on price with Google. That annoys the vendors, because Google appear to want to have their cake and eat it.

    If this Samsung deal is true, then I'm not sure that helps much, as everyone else will remain second class citizens as all the new features come to market on Samsung products first.

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Android phones, apps and tablets

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