Sleeping systems - bags, pads, matts, liners

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  • Probably not but maybe. :) How much you want for it?

  • What are you using for a mat? I've found that decent bags can easily become chilly when used with a less than effective mat.

  • Thermorest neo air xlite. Best I've found as a side sleeper, wish I could sleep on my back.

  • I'm going to get an astucas poncho with down, I think. Will allow me to drop some weight in the item itself and not carry a insulated jacket. Seems a win.

  • Is anyone selling a half decent mat? Comfort is more important than small pack size or weight but I want something I can throw in a backpack for weekends away so nothing huge!

  • Really need to start ordering some sleeping stuff...

    @skinny Sounds like you rate the neo air xlite? Also a side sleeper.

    Any other good mats that should be considered? Probably only for summer riding. Weight important.

  • I have sea to summit ultralight insulated - super comfy, light and R Value - 3 which is good for shoulder seasons if needed.

  • I find it okay as a side sleeper but I dont know if any mat would be truly great, or even better I used a pillow recently and found that helped a lot. I don't blow it up till bursting, so that it's not rock hard.

  • Cheers, looks a similar weight too.

  • Ok cool, thanks

  • Just came across the Uberlite but looks a bit fragile maybe

  • reviews say so

  • Alpkit look to have a cheaper version of Thermarest Zlite Sol

    https://alpkit.com/products/ez-sleeper-f­olding-foam-sleeping-mat

  • Exped Synmat. I found that because the baffles are lengthways rather than crossways like the neoair xlite the pad feels more secure like I'm less likely to roll off it. The side baffles on the Exped are also slightly larger to help keep you on the mat

    Personal preference I guess, but I got a better night's sleep on the Exped as I felt more secure on it and they're quieter when moving around on them.

  • Interesting. I had an exped in past but the valve bust, maybe I'll try another.

  • Hi Guys ! I don't know if somebody talked about this on the Thread but Lesovik finally manage to make a light hammock underquilt.
    Underquilts are often too heavy and it is like you have to take two sleeping bags... I ordered this one and after reception it looks definitely good & pretty light !
    Will come back here to tell you if its good or shit lol

  • I’m after a new mat.
    I’ve only had self inflating mats before but now also considering an air/inflatable mat.
    Are air mats more comfortable than self inflating?

  • Not in my experience, but they are much smaller and lighter to carry.

    I've got a thermarest self inflating which is very comfortable and warm, and I've got an alpkit cloudbase which is still comfortable, but not as much as the thermarest. But then it does pack down tiny and weigh next to nothing.

    I expect thicker / bigger air mats can be more comfortable.

  • I'm not sure if I'm thinking of an older generation of self inflating mats but I find the air mats far more comfortable - they properly keep you off the ground whereas self inflating mats, in my experience, are a small step above yoga rolls...

  • Having used self-inflating mats in the past, and air mats these days, I'd say air mats are better at smoothing out the ground beneath you.

    The other key component to comfort is insulation, as the ground you sleep on is a massive heat-sink.
    If going down the air mat route, look for one with some form of insulation inside it (e.g. Exped Synmat/Downmat, Thermarest etc.). As a rule of thumb, something with a stated R value of 3 or more should be good enough for year-round use in the UK unless you're doing winter mountaineering.
    Decent summary article here: https://ultralightoutdoorgear.co.uk/r-va­lue-explained-i206

    Letting some air out for a little 'give' helps with comfort and can guard against blown baffles.

  • Having used self-inflating mats in the past, and air mats these days, I'd say air mats are better at smoothing out the ground beneath you.

    The other key component to comfort is insulation, as the ground you sleep on is a massive heat-sink.
    If going down the air mat route, look for one with some form of insulation inside it (e.g. Exped Synmat/Downmat, Thermarest etc.). As a rule of thumb, something with a stated R value of 3 or more should be good enough for year-round use in the UK unless you're doing winter mountaineering.
    Decent summary article here: https://ultralightoutdoorgear.co.uk/r-va­lue-explained-i206

    Weight/volume aside, there's no real downside to having a "warmer" mat. Use an appropriate sleeping bag/quilt to prevent being too hot overnight.

    Letting some air out for a little 'give' helps with comfort and can guard against blown baffles.

  • Thanks for the advice guys. And I'll check that link.
    I'm not hugely fussed about weight and pack size (within reason) but I really want a good nights sleep.
    This is me tentatively planning for a long tour so it's important I get it right.

  • I have the old Thermarest self inflator type and the newer Neoair thingies. The newer ones are much smaller, lighter, taller and warmer and pack down better. The only 'less good' thing is probably cost and they're noisier when you move around.

  • Yes that’s pretty much what I’ve found from my research. The neoair is currently top of my wishlist.

  • Thanks again for all the advice guys. I bought a Neoair and have now done two weeks sleeping on it and its has been great.
    Better in every way compared to my old mat, comfier, warmer, lighter and smaller pack size. It was three time the price of the old one though.

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Sleeping systems - bags, pads, matts, liners

Posted by Avatar for StandardPractice @StandardPractice

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