Owning your own home

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  • Super helpful thanks all. Will definitely be relying on architect/ builder advice and doing our best not to rile up the neighbours...

    I presume that if we’re getting a structural survey we can ask to flag any potential issues with an extension.

  • First step would be to enquire with the freeholder to see if any alterations are possible. They might just tell you to do-one.

    Don’t get a surveyor in until you have the basics.

  • Had hoped that part would be ok as Islington Council are the freeholder. That said, it’d be stupid for us not to ask the question pre-purchase. Thanks

  • I presume that if we’re getting a structural survey we can ask to flag any potential issues with an extension.

    Most (at least the surveyors I looked at) recommended you let them know what you have in mind so they can factor that in while surveying. How much use they'll be, I don't know.

    Our, hopeful, purchase has half of the ground floor extended for a kitchen, so I let the surveyor know that we might want to extend the rest of the ground floor for a bigger kitchen/diner and maybe a shower room/wc/utility room. Speaking of which, I think @Brommers, you mentioned something in the difference between needing to seek planning permission and permitted development. Does it sound like this might apply here?

  • Had hoped that part would be ok as Islington Council are the freeholder

    Unless there is something unusual to the set up, the freeholder owns the building, so if you add anything to it, they own that, too. And they have to look after it. So they like stuff that is broadly standard. Random extensions aren't really their thing but you never know.

  • Got my architect to draw up these plans to show what I mean


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  • you mentioned something in the difference between needing to seek planning permission and permitted development. Does it sound like this might apply here?

    I'm not Brommers but the planning portals on the local authority website will have a list of stuff that's been done / is trying to get done and you can deduce what is permitted development from there as it usually says on the Approval notices under what circumstances the approval was granted.

  • There are plenty of horror stories of leaseholders on council freehold getting fleeced.

    http://www.leaseholdknowledge.com

    Currently trying to get a bridging loan for my first house, after property deemed uninhabitable! It needs a studwall moving and a shower put in next to toilet. ....

  • There are plenty of horror stories of leaseholders on council freehold getting fleeced.

    This is a whole separate issue entirely, but yes, having the local authority as the freeholder is a bit of a risk compared to 'normal' leasehold (whatever that is) and places a ceiling on the value of the lease.

  • I'd suggest looking at the council planning website and see if anyone has carried out something similar.

  • What does "Prior Approval No Jurisdiction (GPDO)" mean?

  • I may be about to get fucked by the EWS1. Our building management company has only just started trying to deal with it, they've contacted the building company and are waiting on a reply. We wanted to move by early next year, now I don't think we'll even have that survey done before then and we can't list the flat without one. Let alone the situation where they may say we need to replace the cladding.

  • That is a permitted development application.

  • Grazie. 3 doors down have that as a decision on their full width ground floor extension

  • Speaking of which, I think @Brommers, you mentioned something in the difference between needing to seek planning permission and permitted development. Does it sound like this might apply here?

    If it's a listed building you require planning permission, regardless of your PD rights.

  • Our, hopeful, purchase has half of the ground floor extended for a kitchen, so I let the surveyor know that we might want to extend the rest of the ground floor for a bigger kitchen/diner and maybe a shower room/wc/utility room. Speaking of which, I think @Brommers, you mentioned something in the difference between needing to seek planning permission and permitted development. Does it sound like this might apply here?

    It might do. Although from the photograph it looks as though as well as the rear extension there's also been a loft conversion. You can extend your property by a certain percentage under PD rights, beyond that you need PP. You might still have some space left within PD rights - it'd depend on the GIA before the extensions and after. As Prole. says, if it's listed then PD rights don't apply, but I think it was Nelly's prospective purchase that's listed.

    It's a real minefield of regulations, and I'm far from an expert on these things. If it's a deal breaker rather than just a 'it'd be nice, but' thing then I'd recommend getting specialist advice on whether you'd need PP and, if so, whether you'd get it.

  • Cheers, it is a nice to have, but will keep all this in mind.

  • How difficult is it to get planning for a terraced, leasehold (council freeholder), listed, conservation area, double-storey lower ground and ground floor extension?

    Dunno about PP - probably easier for the LG floor than the G floor - but the chances are you'll also need permission from the LA as freeholder under the terms of the lease. The lease will almost certainly have a covenant against alterations. It might say that structural alterations are totally prohibited, and doing the works would require the lease to be varied or require the LA to waive the covenant. It might say that structural alterations can be carried out with approval, in which case you'd need to get consent to the works, although the LA wouldn't be entitled to unreasonably withhold consent. Many hoops to jump through though, but it'd be worth having a look at the lease if you're serious about it.

    Oh, and even if the LA grants PP for the work, that doesn't necessarily mean they'll grant consent as freeholder. Different rules/tests apply.

  • BBC picking it up now.

    Was expecting to see a quote from @Señor_Bear on the article somewhere.

  • Sorry to hear it. I can bring you up to speed if you want/need to know a bit more.

  • Really comprehensive reporting BBC


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  • They’re at the top of their game

  • wait, you are only 27?!

  • Our garage project is back on track, the builder who we thought had totally forgotten about us is back! We had already asked another guy to take a look but he got too busy for a piddly little garage job, we had just started ringing other tradesmen when #1 guy got back in touch...

    He's thanked us for our patience and is gonna reduce the cost of the job as a thank you... I'll believe that when I see it but very happy to finally (hopefully!) have this happening... He's the best guy in the area, an engineer by trade, an excellent draughtsman and produces very high quality work...

    Can't wait to have a little workshop, pillar drill here I come! I also want a lathe... Just because I can... Then we get him to build a verandah onto the front of the house... New bathroom also going in during the next twelve months, busy (expensive) year!

  • I also want a lathe...

    I got very drunk at my partners Christmas party about 15 years ago and very nearly bought a lathe. I think the only thing that stopped me was not being able to buy one online there and then. If it happened today I expect I'd have bought one. Still don't really know what I'd do with it.

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Owning your own home

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