News: Specialized to release OTP-Ghost bikes

Posted on
Page
of 2
/ 2
Next
  • Sorry if this is repost.

    Source: http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2009/06/s­pecialized-to-roll-out-cheap-fixed-gear-­bikes/

    *One of the attractions of the fixed-gear bike is that they are cheap. Find an old beat-up road bike, buy a new hub and throw away all extraneous hardware. You now have a fixie.

    Of course, as they got more popular, this didn’t last, and you can now pick up custom-made fixies for prices that seem closer to the track-bikes which inspired them. Specialized is attempting to redress this with the Rolls 1 and 2, bikes made under the company’s new Globe brand.

    Most striking is the color-scheme: all white and chrome. Look beyond the pretty appearance and you’ll see some nice, normally high-end touches, from the integrated handlebar and stem to the built-in chain tensioners on the back dropouts/fork ends.

    The Roll 2 will cost $800 and the slightly lower-end Roll 1 will go for $600, which isn’t bad. Both will go official as part of the full Globe brand rollout on June 28th, when you’ll also see the more pedestrian city bikes in the range.*

    Na...

  • Interesting - some nice bikes coming out it would seem . . .

    http://bikehugger.com/2009/06/this-is-no­t-your-fathers-langs.html

    To be clear before we continue, Specialized is trying to craft a branding around the Globe, it's a product lineup that's designed to have a life outside the traditional circle of Specialized dealers, and in fact there are discussions about introducing the Globe to retailers outside the traditional dealer network. Think of seeing the Globe at hotels like Portland's Ace hotel as borrowers, or finding the Globe for sale inside a hip vinyl shop in New York and you have the idea. To that end, the company would probably prefer that we not refer to these bikes as Specialized Globe, but that makes it very difficult to talk about the company's branding decisions and other policies--there isn't a spin-off company called Globe here, so while the lineup is different the policies all come from the Morgan Hill HQ.
    That's also where you'll find Amber Lucas, the young, fascinating engineer who designed the whole Globe line. From sketch to manufacturing Amber designed every lug, weld and braze-on. She's exactly the type of person you'd want to design urban bikes as she lacks a TV at home and talks about measurements and tube specifications without much provocation. She's passionate about the bikes.

    We'll reserve the full-blown review for a time when the Globe lineup gets to stay with us for more than a few hours of riding, but our initial impressions on the line were very good. The company, (and by which I largely mean Amber) have made some great choices in these bikes, although some tweaks are clearly necessary in future models.
    The most attention went to the Roll, the singlespeed/fixed gear line that's prettier than any stock bike that comes from another big manufacturer. Let me say that again, the Roll line has the attention to detail that's often only found in custom bikes. The head-tube area is a metal-frame (slip in any graphic you'd like), the parts feature a gorgeous chrome job, and the paint colors are subtle and eye-popping. (My wife told me to "come home with the blue" one when she saw some of the detail photos I'd done.)
    Starting with the second-up Roll the bikes have in-house made crowns (making them stand out from even custom builders who get their crowns from the same shops and file them down) and little features like the custom fork binding bolt that's integrated into the fork. The welds are super-clean and look like they came from a robot in a Porsche factory. This is a drool worth bike.


  • The Globe brand has been around since the nineties as a part of its Specialized parent, but starting now it is it’s own entity with a new line, starting here with the Roll. Think the way that Mini is made by BMW but occupies a separate segment of the market and you will see the new Globe. Launched just this week in Minneapolis, the new Globe is build on a vision of inspiring others to ride bicycles through solid design from both an aesthetic and functional end.Shown is the Roll 2, retailing for just about $800 but in my opinion with a look and feel of bikes much higher in price. It’s all in the small touches, like the keyed washer system of the front hub that simultaneously locks the hub in place and lends a seamless line to the lugged crown fork – super slick, and it doesn’t require a special hub at all since the actual dropouts are as standard as they get.


    The integrated stem/bar combo is also unexpected at this pricepoint as such things are typically reserved for custom bikes costing 3-4x what the Roll 2 comes in at. While there is a valid concern about not being able to alter stem length without changing the entire cockpit, one can’t help but notice the clean lines the one piece system lends. And no worries, the grip area is standard diameter to fit the grips and brake levers we’re all accustomed to. The internal clamp keeps the back of the stem knee-friendly with a lack of clamp bolts and the sharp edges they many times exhibit. Roughly shoulder width, or just about the width of a set of hoods on road bars, the bar isn’t overly skinny for urban riding by any stretch. Out back the forged fork ends have integrated chain tensioners and exhibit the only Globe branding outside of the headbadge present on the bike, furthering the largely anonymous urban aesthetic. The Kashimax-style one piece plastic saddle also gives a nod to how many people are building up their personal bikes these days. While it received mixed reviews from the folks giving it a spin here in Minneapolis, I found it comfortable for the few around town miles I spent on the perch, but I tend to prefer harder, narrow saddles as it is. 42mm deep rims are laced up to sealed bearing hubs, another high value item at the $800 level. Sugino messenger cranks make it go, fixed or free choices come standard, and a pair of brakes are in the box to make it all come to a controlled stop.


    Potentially most interesting to some is the lower priced Roll 1, sharing the same frame but with a unicrown fork that is nearly indistinguishable and slight downspec changes such as loose ball bearing hubs and not-so-deep V-section rims for just about $600. No word on geometry specifics for the four available sizes, but I will say that the bottom bracket seemed a bit low for my tastes, though some may prefer the more stable stance that the lower center of gravity lends. After a day riding the Roll I’d have to say that Globe is going to give some steep competition to the rest of the market with it’s price and feature set, not to mind the aesthetics that just aren’t matched by anyone else out there. Look for these bikes to start appearing in shops in just about six weeks time if not sooner and keep an eye out for more reports on the new Globe line come next week, including shots and impressions of their two cargo carrying bikes, the Live and the Haul. There is plenty more to tell.

  • Throw on some Brooks shizz and you too can have:

    EdsMissusBike-a-like

    ;)

  • I can see the globe shoe brand causing a fuss about this.

  • That saddle reminds me of a duck.

  • That saddle reminds me of a saddle.

  • I can see the globe shoe brand causing a fuss about this.

    Have they caused a fuss about all the other Globe branded bikes?

    Looks like some really nice details on there. It will be interesting to see what pricepoint they go for here.

  • That saddle reminds me of a duck.

    http://www.thispeanutlookslikeaduck.com/­

  • "The integrated stem/bar combo is also unexpected at this pricepoint as such things are typically reserved for custom bikes"

    Presumably because your personal dimensions are considered for a full custom build, negating the need for adjustable components.

  • I like the dropouts on the forks, bar/stem combo is sweet if you like a flat bar, but not much use otherwise.

  • Hmmmmm clean but bland. Lifestyle machine.

    I expect it will be a phenomenal sales success but does little to improve the breed.

    Oh and is everyone not bored to death with deep section rims for the sake of it?

  • Oh and is everyone not bored to death with deep section rims for the sake of it?

    Apparently not the people who sell OTP bikes

  • Hmmmmm clean but bland. Lifestyle machine.

    I expect it will be a phenomenal sales success but does little to improve the breed.

    Oh and is everyone not bored to death with deep section rims for the sake of it?
    Open pros all the way now for me. . .

  • Still looks like a Ghost bike to me. - just very light blue...

    And yes - unless for a purpose, I think Deep rims are very Fad'y.

    Think; Crazy Frog, Spice Girls, Pokémon, Dr Martens, Tamagotchi, Warhammer....

    And how much we sick upon our keyboards thinking about it.

  • (apologises for offending anyone)

  • all white bikes always look great (imo) - I don't think it'd be confused with a ghost bike, uless ghost bikes suddenly got theft worthy.
    I think ambers doing a great job.. I for one would love someone to tell me to design a bike, wouldn't you?

  • Still looks like a Ghost bike to me. - just very light blue...

    And yes - unless for a purpose, I think Deep rims are very Fad'y.

    Think; Crazy Frog, Spice Girls, Pokémon, Dr Martens, Tamagotchi, Warhammer....

    And how much we sick upon our keyboards thinking about it.

    Never mind offending some people, I think you've just offended almost every part of the forum's demographic with that statement!! I'm personally taking offence at at least 2 of those! :)

  • The real boon of this will probably be the availability of cheap components, if specialized/globe are as smart as charge were.

    (ie the seperate release of charge spoon saddles, bars, bartape, grips etc.)

    It could mean that the availability of kashimax-esque saddles, double straps, and weird bar-stem combos increase. Which would be nice for some people.

    And also you have to remember that the bike industry will always be a year at least behind the fashion trends. I think they should be leading them, rather than cowering to them, but that's not the way our planet works, clearly!

  • ASM- points taken. Just my opinions i guess...

    You're right, cycling is brilliant! The more we, and anyone can do to promote it's growth is great.

    As with fashion, we all have tastes though, I wouldn't build, buy or ride an all white bike because of it's more sinister meaning in the cycling community.

    http://www.ghostbikes.org/

    As for deep rims, that was my opinion... Some like, some don't...

  • "The integrated stem/bar combo is also unexpected at this pricepoint as such things are typically reserved for custom bikes"

    Presumably because your personal dimensions are considered for a full custom build, negating the need for adjustable components.

    i briefly thought they should have a line of bar/stem (stars?) combos, and then i went back to thinking about this chick i'm trying to get with.

    anyway these fancy OTP bikes just aren't my thing. sooooo boring. still sooooo much better than having people not ride at all. if it takes this kind of stuff, then fine.

    BSNYC's most recent post:
    http://bikesnobnyc.blogspot.com/2009...c­hnicolor.html
    *
    Obviously, the Globe name has been around for awhile, and obviously the Roll isn't the only Globe model, but it's interesting that Specialized is using a bike like this to officially launch a brand that will focus on urban cycling and commuting for the "progressively minded and the eco-conscious," since the scope of possible uses for the Roll is slightly broader than that of a unicycle. Really, they might as well have launched the brand with a time trial bike.

    Ultimately, the Roll represents a phenomeon I call the "fixed-gear inversion." At first, when fixed-gears started getting really popular people said, "At least more people are riding." Essentially, the idea was that the fixed-gear was sort of a "gateway drug" for new cyclists, and that once you got hooked you'd eventually explore what the rest of the cycling world had to offer. However, now that the trend is firmly established, the opposite is happening, and instead companies must flash a trendified ready-made fixie at the door in order to gain access to the cycling market. Moreover, companies must refer to these bikes as "urban" and tout their functionality in cities, despite the fact that color-coordinated brakeless fixed-gears are being ridden increasingly by younger people in the suburbs who do tricks on them in their cul-de-sacs.

    The "fixed-gear inversion" even extends to color. First people used black tires. Then, they used white tires as a striking contrast to black tires. Then the bikes became colorful. Now, it's all about monochromatic bikes as a striking contrast to colorful bikes.*

  • Hmmmmm clean but bland. Lifestyle machine.

    I expect it will be a phenomenal sales success but does little to improve the breed.

    Oh and is everyone not bored to death with deep section rims for the sake of it?

    The deep v rim is designed for a purpose, not a style. If you look at the cross section of the rim (as if you were to cut perpendicularly to the braking surface) you will see that it is in the shape of a "V" that is taller (or deeper) than a normal rim, hence the name "Deep V". This gives a greater horizontal area along the verticle axis so the stress will be able to "spread" itself out more. The ideas can be compared to why buildings use "I" beams.

    In simple terms, deep v's are lot harder to bend vertically (such as if you are to ride off a curb or come down hard from a wheelie). So, those of us who ride our fixies hard will not have to be as careful with impacting our wheels.

  • the deep section rim is used a lot for style too.

  • 99% of fixie skidderrs go deep because it looks da bomb down hoxton way, i doubt they have a clue how the rim is even built - personally i think a box section rim 36h is probably better for london roads

  • Purpose built, bunny hopping bike......

  • Post a reply
    • Bold
    • Italics
    • Link
    • Image
    • List
    • Quote
    • code
    • Preview
About

News: Specialized to release OTP-Ghost bikes

Posted by Avatar for jeanmi @jeanmi

Actions