Crank Length?

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  • The mean streets of 'ol London Town + Fixed gear = ? crank length.

    [size=40]?[/size]

    Cheers.

  • 165mm on Raleigh
    170mm on Soma
    172.5mm on Ribble (geared)
    175mm on GT (geared)

    I don't pedal strike on any but I'm slow through corners.

  • yes hippy is an expert on being cranky

  • Unless you are happening to do a TT in the service roads of the Thames Flood Barrier, I would say 170mm is fine.

    But 165mm is better.

  • hippy feeling a little cranky....

  • on track frames 165mm or 170mm never pedal strike, 170mm on a touring frame + lyotard wide pedals = lotsa strike :(

  • wayne_f14 yes hippy is an expert on being cranky

    boom tish! jelly snake for wayno!

  • Cheers ladies.

    165mm it is.

  • dogsballs on track frames 165mm or 170mm never pedal strike, 170mm on a touring frame + lyotard wide pedals = lotsa strike :(

    what 'lyotard' mean boss ?

    (Lycra+retard?)

  • = hippy?

  • hippy [quote]wayne_f14 yes hippy is an expert on being cranky

    boom tish! jelly snake for wayno![/quote]

    Aww I'd love a Jelly snake.

    Something I heard yesterday:

    "I don't associate bears and worms at all. Not until I think of the word gummy"

  • You need to think about your height and leg length as well, since that's the main criteria for crank length. People usually go a bit shorter on fixed gears than on geared bikes to minimise the risk of pedal strike and to be able to spin faster (since you can't change gear to stay at a steady cadence). I would say on a fixed gear that most people go for 165mm with people with legs longer than about 33" starting to go for 170s. Some companies do 167.5s which could be a happy medium.

  • tynan [quote]dogsballs on track frames 165mm or 170mm never pedal strike, 170mm on a touring frame + lyotard wide pedals = lotsa strike :(

    what 'lyotard' mean boss ?

    (Lycra+retard?)[/quote]

    nice vintage pedals ;)

  • roland Unless you are happening to do a TT in the service roads of the Thames Flood Barrier, I would say 170mm is fine.

    But 165mm is better.

    I managed on 170 - but I came last. :-(

    I hear that shorter is easier for spinning and skidding.

  • dogsballs [quote]tynan [quote]dogsballs on track frames 165mm or 170mm never pedal strike, 170mm on a touring frame + lyotard wide pedals = lotsa strike :(

    what 'lyotard' mean boss ?

    (Lycra+retard?)[/quote]

    nice vintage pedals ;)[/quote]

    Gotcha !

  • i think about 5-7 minutes should do it.

  • TheBrick(Tommy) = hippy?

    I resemble that remark!

  • Momentum You need to think about your height and leg length as well, since that's the main criteria for crank length. People usually go a bit shorter on fixed gears than on geared bikes to minimise the risk of pedal strike and to be able to spin faster (since you can't change gear to stay at a steady cadence). I would say on a fixed gear that most people go for 165mm with people with legs longer than about 33" starting to go for 170s. Some companies do 167.5s which could be a happy medium.

    Cheers, good information, I do happen to have (beautiful) long legs (for my height) - so maybe 170mm might be an option (?)

    . . . wait, let me get a tape measure . . . .

    How do you measure leg length ??

    Is it the bottom of your foot (the floor) right up to the inside of the crown jewels ?

  • I uses this method:

    The procedure is as follows: Stand in an upright position, without shoes, on a hard floor, and with your feet about 25cm (10") apart. Place the spine of a book about 1.5 inches (3.5cm) wide between your legs firmly, but without causing pain. The measure is then taken vertically from floor to the edge of the book.

    I came out at 33.75".

    If I can find a 675.5mm that would be great, but it looks like 165mm / 170mm should also be fine - (they are going on a track frame).

    I normally ride 175mm on my MTB.

  • 165 on all fixed gears
    172.5 on my road bike

    certain velodromes mandate 165 cranks.

  • 165s probably give you about 10 extra rpm at the top end of your cadence spectrum.

    I went back to 170s cos I can still manage 200rpm with 'em, and I can use the extra leverage to get up severe climbs. (I'm 31" IL)

    In an ideal world where I had more bikes and money, I'd have 165s on my track bike, 170s on my road fixed, and 180s on my hillclimb bike, but life's too short....

    ... though in an ideal world I'd have one life a bit longer than my other one to give me more time to get up climbs.

  • I'm no expert, but it's the modern world so I was able to google for this which is a pretty good summary. Also Bringmemyfix covers the key points.

    http://www.cptips.com/crnklth.htm

    Key quote to remember there "Track riders generally choose crankarms up to 5 mm shorter and mountain bikers up to 5 mm longer than the above recommendations"

  • Every piece of advice with a grain of salt, e.g. "trackies will use 165mm".. yeah sure, that is quite common on the track but what if you're a pursuiter? Some guys are using 180mm cranks on the track! I can feel a difference within the 165-175mm range but it's not massive so it will come down to use of bike and personal feeling of various cranks. Spin to win!

    More: http://www.cyclingforums.com/t123442-tra­ck-crank-length.html

  • Hello all,

    I'm in the process of building up my first fixed and wanted some opinion on what length of cranks to go for...

    I've read about pedal strike and so 165mm cranks seem the way to go, but could I get away with 170mm? Ive seen a few on ebay that look nice, but is this foolish on a track frame?

    Say hi if you see me around SE5 - I'm geared (for now) on a lurvely Reynolds 753 pug in blue.... Cheers, Cookie

  • seriously 170, 172.5 will be fine on any track frame. if you want to spend the extra because 165 is cooler then fine.

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Crank Length?

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