GPS tech (Garmin, Hammerhead, Wahoo, RWGPS, etc)

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  • velocity boy: You spoke of motorcycle GPS units being useful for bikes. US Ebay has Garmin Quest 2 units going for $300-500

    An mtb blogger (forget which) did a dual-century on his Pompino (mention of ss/fixed = lfgss on-topic'ness! ;)) and used a Garmin Etrex Legend $160USD RRP and $90USD on ebay. With the stong UKP these units can be had much cheaper (mind your import duties). He said you need Memory Map and the right maps for it but it's all GPS gibberish right now so I'm gonna keep taking idle glances at the equipment until I work it all out. Be useful for group rides rather than soggy maps (not that the soggy map was ineffective mdja!!). If I get my backside into some Audax events it could be a useful bit of kit too, with map backup..

    Yes, it's another slow day in the office with boss not around.. so sue me!

  • you can download the maps off the net i think,i did with my mates tom tom go

  • Memory Map is used because that gives you the Ordnance Survey 1:25000 maps which also give you really accurate altitude information.

    The thing I found with cycling GPS units is that they're designed for computer use. Route plan on your PC, sync up and follow the GPS device.

    What I like about things like the Tom Tom unit for motorcycles is that aside from being waterproof (if it's not designed for hiking, cycling and outdoor pursuits then units aren't usually weather proof) it allows you to route plan on the fly. That for me is one of the killer features, because I like the idea of not using the GPS, cycling to the middle of nowhere, and then turn it on and plot a nice route home. That's more like how I will use a GPS.

    Consider the Southend ride. We didn't take the route we agreed in advance. We chose a different route and ad-lib'd it. That worked, but I would want any GPS device to allow us to be at that start line and say, "Right, let's make a new route now based on the new criteria we have.". So those units that you have to route plan in advance with, they're just not for me.

  • Tom Tom are too big big though though..
    http://www.tomtom.com/products/category.­php?ID=1&Language=1

  • velocity boy
    Consider the Southend ride. We didn't take the route we agreed in advance. We chose a different route and ad-lib'd it. That worked, but I would want any GPS device to allow us to be at that start line and say, "Right, let's make a new route now based on the new criteria we have.". So those units that you have to route plan in advance with, they're just not for me.

    What about the Etrex (https://buy.garmin.com/shop/shop.do?pID=­8703&locale=en_US)?
    1,000 waypoints, 176 x 220 pixel display, 25-hour battery life, automatic routing capabilities, color screen, microSD card slot, compass, altimeter, high-sensitivity GPS receiver

    It appears to let you whack in miniSD full of maps. I'm not sure how big map files are but I'm guessing you could easily cover a day's ride with a miniSD card..
    Surely it would let you veer off the chosen route, so long as it was within the bounds of the installed maps?

  • https://buy.garmin.com/shop/shop.do?pID=­310&locale=en_US

    "The 60CSx comes with a blank 64 megabyte (MB) microSD card, so you can store extra maps from optional MapSource® mapping software. Just connect to your computer with the USB cable, and you can load map data or transfer routes and waypoints."

  • I have a Garmin Edge 205. Which is OK, but not brilliant. The good thing is that you can import maps straight out of Bikely. The bad thing is that you're limited to 100 waypoints on a route. The display's nice - I use the compass view mostly, and it does automagically direct you to the next waypoint rather than force you back along the route: if you decide to go walkabout. And it's small and light. But it doesn't do mapping and routefinding. That's a different thing, to my mind. I don't think a lot of GPSs do elevation-based route-mapping rather than distance-based...

    Garmin's software is a bunch of arse, though.

  • ont riders for certin companys get gps, i know lima had one at one point.

  • Does anyone here use GPS? I've seen some bike-specific ones, has anyone tried them?

  • My friend has the Edge 305 and he really likes it. I've been looking myself and I would rather get one with more detail that can take maps rather than limit myself to something like that. It's good but is very specific to cycling, for that money I would want something that I could use elsewhere too. That said, as a training tool it's apparently very good, you do things like race yourself over previous best times on your route to work or whatever and also set yourself targets etc. Also monitors bpm and cadence which can be handy.

  • I'm looking into them at the moment as well..

    The maps aren't necessarily a good thing due to the screens being so small and higher power use.
    I'm looking at it more from a touring/long ride point of view. Map a route at home and then follow it OR ride a route and have it record for later use.
    For this you don't need the maps. I'm not sure if I'd be limiting myself without maps or not? There's a few mapping packages too Fugawi, MemoryMap and TrackLines or something? These and the maps all cost money on top of the unit too and their features are probably as important as the unit itself. Battery power is an issue, other wise for a 2-day trip, you need to carry a charger. Mounting to bike needs to be good and unit needs to be proper waterproof..

    Basically I'm no closer to deciding than I was 12 months ago. :S

  • I have a Garmin 205, and it's the bollocks.

    You can use Bikely to map out routes on Google maps and then upload them to the unit, which gives you a nice idiot-friendly "follow the arrow" direction thingy. You press a button and it starts recording data, which you can then upload to your computer when you're home again. I'm now hankering for the 305, as it gives even more data! ;-)

    The Garmin software is an abortion, though. I use Ascent on OSX, but there are some Windows equivalents.

    The only real problem I've had with it is that it can take a while to get a solid GPS signal, and you're limited to only 50 waypoints on your routes - which means it's not much cop for long, complicated rides. Apart from that, it's excellent.

  • i met a man in Germany who powered a car tom-tom from a dynamo hub - pretty handy.

  • The best solution I saw for touring distance, dynamic route re-calculation, clear screen in all lights, etc.

    Well it was the all-weather Tom Tom designed for motor bikes.

    You do need to consider a dynamo hub for it as bombadil has said. But the solution is the bees knees.

    Now all we need is for GPS mapmakers to markup the roads according to their suitability of traffic. GPS devices don't take into account the difference between your pushbike and a truck, and so sometimes the routes are quite ridiculous.

  • what is the price lik eon these suckers?

  • my cousin's got the garmin forerunner. it's the running equiv of the edge. fists your wrist, so smaller than the edge, but still too chunky....very limited on mapping, but good enough if you just want to record your ride. its got the usual indicators, speed, pace, dist travelled, elevation gain, etc...i think its got heartrate as well. was considering it mainly for recording ride stats.

  • Those Etrex ones - are they geared mor etowards the hiking market?

    it could be useful having a map one for cycling around a new city.
    if you coudl mount it on the bars somehow, - but £200 seems abit steep - I think i'll stick with my £5 mini A-Z.

  • i don't think its really necessary for touring though. I managed to cycle to Istanbul (geared) without any guide books or GPS - just bought a map in each country (and the bulgarian one was in cyrillic script). got lost a lot but thats part of the fun.

  • Yeah.. I've done that kinda thing too.. but now I want a GPS so that when I 'have' to make Place X.. I'm not going around in circles like I usually do..
    Nottingham ride would have been more pleasant if I could watch an arrow move on my bars rather than dragging out a google maps printout every 5min.

  • the new garmin 605 is being released in december,

    had a bit of a fiddle with it at the bike show, then i had a look at the GPS unit...

    looks like the real deal for route finding and as a training monitor

    do you know the way to san jose

  • the battery life seems shortish on these units. 10 hours is fine most of the time but for a ride that spanned two days you would be screwed.

  • wayne_f14 the new garmin 605 is being released in december,

    had a bit of a fiddle with it at the bike show, then i had a look at the GPS unit...

    looks like the real deal for route finding and as a training monitor

    do you know the way to san jose

    ..i've been a way soo long from san jose.....wooooo...wooooo...wo woo!

    that's one of my favourite songs! i'll be singing that all day now!

  • wayne_f14 the new garmin 605 is being released in december,

    [/url]

    That looks pretty awesome, I like the bike functionality of the 305 but as I said above, not having the maps is a downside for me. That seems to cover all bases. Battery life is shite but just get a couple of spares.

  • benanza [quote]wayne_f14 the new garmin 605 is being released in december,

    [/url]

    Battery life is shite but just get a couple of spares.[/quote]

    Can't be done - integrated battery. It charges off USB though, so you might be able to get a top-up battery for it.

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GPS tech (Garmin, Hammerhead, Wahoo, RWGPS, etc)

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