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  • Is it usual for tests to be created and conducted for non banned substances?

    It seems that this was a targeted raid, presumably based on intelligence, by a public health service. I'm guessing they had reasonable grounds to suspect that the substance had been supplied other than through the regulated channel, which might involve some criminality under French domestic law.

    It doesn't seem to have been an anti-doping raid.

    The use of hair samples points to the intelligence being related to administration from several days to several weeks prior to the raid.

  • It’s certainly an interesting case. Which raises both some broader and specific questions.

    It also ties to the notion, that the athlete as 100% individually accountable to be a flawed philosophy. Particularly for professional athletes who might have a team of medical professionals. Any one of which may well have their own motivations and or pressures.

  • It also ties to the notion, that the athlete as 100% individually accountable to be a flawed philosophy

    I don't really go with this, certainly at the world tour level. Riders should know what they're taking. During the 90s the "confessions" are rife with riders saying that their doctor told them to trust them and just take the pill, the injection, use the cream etc. Even if we assume those statements are true (I suspect some are, some aren't), it shows that taking what the team doctor gives you without question can lead into dangerous places.

  • the athlete as 100% individually accountable to be a flawed philosophy. Particularly for professional athletes

    Why "particularly"? I'd say the opposite, that the fact of being a pro makes it particularly important that an athlete should refuse any treatment about which he has even the slightest question.

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