• About to be launched:

    https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2019­/apr/06/london-prepares-for-launch-of-ul­tra-low-emissions-zone

    As with the Congestion Charge previously, the questions include whether the charge is high enough (the CC was not), how long it will take for businesses to pass it on to their customers, and whether TfL's predictions are accurate (as they only expect a 5% reduction of vehicular traffic, it is to be hoped that they are too low, at least initially--with the CC, the effect in the first few days was dramatic, but it soon became business as usual, which I expect to be the case with this charge, too). Also, how long will it take for polluting vehicles to be replaced? Obviously, the whole thing is a bit of a fillip for the promotion of electric cars.

    Needless to say, it'll also be interesting to see if there will be such a marked increase in cycling as there was with Congestion Charging--although a lot of that was due to the return of the Shoreditch Triangle to two-way operation.

  • Anecdotally I know a few people in kennington who are finally going car free due to the charge.

    They didn't drive much anyway, but it'll stop their old bangers from littering the street as they gently rust to pieces.

  • Yes, let's hope more people will think this way.

    There will, however, inevitably be a good deal of 'fleet renewal', replacing less advanced inappropriate technology with slightly more advanced inappropriate technology.

    I expect most of the to-be-expected shift will be towards public transport, which might go a little way towards reversing falling public transport passenger numbers--but other trends, such as 'stay at home', might continue. It'll be interesting to watch--well, if you're interested in that sort of thing.

    One of the most important things will be for the charge to keep up with the times. I haven't read much about it yet, so don't know how or if they're proposing to do that.

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