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  • A very slight change of emphasis (not very different from your version, but I find it important): I wouldn't put it in terms of competition, but in terms of accessibility (as above). If you can buy something like what you want locally, even if perhaps the choice isn't as great as in Central London, but you don't have to go on a Tube or railway journey to get there, then you may choose greater accessibility over greater choice.

    Do fast rail links to central London kill off local development, or do they accelarate it?

    One really big example is Stratford, where being a growing transport hub justified the shopping center, which then attracted housing, which is supporting more shopping and offices.

    It's true on a smaller scale, too. Vauxhall has been gaining, not losing, restaurants and shops despite being on one of the best train links to the city immaginable.

    I think happens because people over-value options, even if they are never likely to use those options in practice. For example people who buy trucks "in case they need to carry something heavy" despite the fact they are always used for the commute to work.

    So people value links to London, but then end up shopping locally if they can because it's easier. But you have to have the option to get to the city, to persuade enough people to move there, to make the local services and jobs viable.

    A counter example might be Nine Elms, which is attracting people and jobs without a good rail link. But they've got the promise of two stations on the way, and the developers are subsidising private busses to try and cover the gap.

  • Vauxhall has been gaining, not losing, restaurants and shops despite being on one of the best train links to the city immaginable.

    This is in a large part in spite of NR. But now we have sold off Commercial estate to Blackstone/TT (the company will be called The Arch Co) expect this to accelerate very quickly in the next few years.

    Large station redevelopments should bring changes to the area. Whether they are good are bad is a case for the planners to argue over. As it’s public bodies that propose station re-generation, the links to the local gov and assoc parties are much stronger, so should develop schemes that benefit the local area and its community.

    Certainly from my experiences on TLP, the section 106 requirements from the local councils were geared towards this and the carrot to NR was the improved retail ops, but even that has stipulations on who ‘gets back in’ to the station when it’s done

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