Avatar for ChainBreaker

ChainBreaker

Member since Jul 2009 • Last active Aug 2015

Most recent activity

  • in Miscellaneous & Meaningless
    Avatar for ChainBreaker

    Your a sarco-plasmist

  • Avatar for ChainBreaker

    Cheers lady!

    Possibly interested

    When do you need it out? I have a couple weeks to go before completion and then I'll be bed needy

  • in Miscellaneous & Meaningless
    Avatar for ChainBreaker

    It is generally accepted in the strength-training world that one of the best ways to increase your pressing strength is to increase the strength of what is considered the weak link–the triceps. Especially in the sport of power lifting, the triceps are considered the weak link in a bench press. So every trainee performs, and every strength coach usually recommends, either the close-grip bench press or the dip to get the job done. This is a no-brainer.

    When it comes to maximizing muscle-ups, rope climbs, pull-ups, and snatches, stronger biceps will allow you to handle more weight on your compound upper back exercises. This in turn carries over to helping you ace the marine pull-up test, lift the inver stone off the ground, improve your overhead squat, and pull the truck-on-a-rope like soap-on-a-rope!

    In my experience consulting with strength athletes from around the world, increasing biceps strength to improve pulling strength has gone in the wrong direction. I hear the following far too often: Do I really need to perform curls at all to strengthen my biceps if I’m doing heavy rows and chins and stuff? Sure, the compound movement alone will strengthen the weak link (the biceps) because the strength of the weak link will give out first. But to maximize stimulation of the major muscles that are supposed to be doing most of the pulling work (the upper back), you have to maximize the strength of the biceps through direct biceps work.

    There is an additional bonus. Strong biceps limit the potential for injuries like elbow tendonitis and bicepital tendonitis of the shoulder. Further, the possibility of suffering a complete muscle rupture or tear from that heavy deadlift can be avoided.

    One reason biceps training has fallen out of favour is that true strength athletes don’t want to be considered body builders; they don’t want to appear vain by specifically training their biceps. At best they’ll throw in a couple of half-hearted curls at the end of a workout and call it a day. This won’t get your upper back as strong as possible—and you better if you want Herculean strength! Approach biceps training seriously, and by “seriously” I don’t mean 20 sets of five different exercises to pump you up.
    sweatrxmag.com/flex-appeal-the-im­portance-of-strong-biceps/

  • in Miscellaneous & Meaningless
    Avatar for ChainBreaker

    Lol...

    And you think pull ups aren't vanity exercises? When was the last time you actually needed to pull yourself up on a pole 15 times? Hell, when was the last you had to do it once? Besides getting on your high horse? (meant with a friendly overtone of course)

    Last time I did a curl movement? Yesterday on the tube I had to pick up my rucksack over people's laps and bags and shit. And it's not a light bag either.

    I can do both exercises and do. Both are good for you.

  • Avatar for ChainBreaker

    Or curls for the gurls...

    dah.

  • in Miscellaneous & Meaningless
    Avatar for ChainBreaker

    now i want to do some curls...

  • in Miscellaneous & Meaningless
    Avatar for ChainBreaker

    @TRA you need to remember that your biceps are a smaller group so massive weight isnt necessary.

  • in Miscellaneous & Meaningless
    Avatar for ChainBreaker

    Why stop curling? nothing wrong with it. I curl loads. And do tris... And shoulders. and calves if i can be arsed.

Actions