How To Lock Your Bike

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  • Seeing that we have a topic called How not to lock your bike, I figure it would be much more helpful to have a topic showing the best method of locking your bike, you can included photos of your own if you deemed your locking method to be decent.

    First example, a beater that's excellently locked up;

    [[/URL]

    It got the forum's favourite lock, the Kryptonite Fahgettaboudit locking both frame and wheel to the stand not leaving enough leverage rooms.

    The rear wheel is securely locked with a pitlock-style nuts, and the saddle have a chain looped round it to the frame;

    [URL="i256.photobucket.com/albums/hh167/edscoble/lockingmethod-1.jpg?t=1286637803"]![](http://i256.photobucket.com/albums/hh167/edscoble/lockingmethod-1.jpg?t=1286637803)
    ](i256.photobucket.com/albums/hh167/edscoble/5816b496.jpg?t=1286637587)

  • Excellent Ed. I've been saying this all along, and even suggested people posting photos of such well locked up bikes.
    This thread will become an extremely useful resource.

    Here are some examples I had admired previously.

    • IMG00662-20100903-1541d.jpg
    • IMG00707-20101004-1326d.jpg
  • Balki has a photo of my Fuji pre-Penguination, rocking a tri-spoke locked up.

    It was, frankly, over-protected as I recall.

  • Pix, or it didn't happen. :D

    And Lukeyb, it would be good to turn this into a serious thread on examples of good->excellent bike security.
    It would be a real shame to just throw joke pictures into the thread.

  • ...Here are some examples I had admired previously.

    Some good eg's there, but I think you should delete that first specialized.

    I know they are using good locks (and 2-types), but the D-Lock should be going through the seattube and providing less room for tools.

    (good idea for a thread btw.)

  • You are right hugo7, and Ed. Its deleted.

  • Sure.

    But as this is meant to teach ppl the idea way, it might be worth putting a note in the post with the pictures?

    Anyway, like I said good thread - this one is def a good eg of minimising space between the d-lock:
    static.lfgss.com/attachments/31793d1286647465-img00662-20100903-1541d.jpg

    I also may as well add, that I never knew how to properly lock my bike until I read a post on the forum. Mos def something that the major bike stores should be doing.

  • There's a huge gap in the rear D-lock on that Specialized, it's much easier to put a bolt cutter (which would be used for the front lock), and use that as a leverage to removed the rear.

    edit - Hugo said it all.

  • the problem with those cdales is that they shouldn't even be locked. wheeling that out for a commute is a fail to being with. so far eds is the only one which is sensible. and the cdales could both lose an entire lock by simply installing some locking skewers. efficiency fail.

  • I commute on a Capo 5. Its good for me.

  • Great idea for a thread...

  • It got the forum's favourite lock, the Kryptonite Fahgettaboudit locking both frame and wheel to the stand not leaving enough leverage rooms.

    The rear wheel is securely locked with a pitlock-style nuts, and the saddle have a chain looped round it to the frame;

    [/QUOTE]

    Isn't having an undesirable saddle enough to put off the crooks? Who would steal that?! Having it manacled to the frame is only going to encourage thievery as no one would nick that unless the chain was there in the first place to tell them it was worth nicking! Haha.

    edit: very thorough though - nothing wrong with that.

  • Genuine question. Why wouldn't you lock through the frame and the rear wheel? Rear is usually the more expensive of the two and a Fagh can fit round the stand and the bike. If i have to I always secure the rear wheel and frame to the stand and then use another locking option on the front.

    He has pitlocks on the rear but many people don't.

  • Sure. But as this is meant to teach ppl the idea way, it might be worth putting a note in the post with the pictures? Anyway, like I said good thread - this one is def a good eg of minimising space between the d-lock: http://static.lfgss.com/attachments/31793d1286647465-img00662-20100903-1541d.jpg I also may as well add, that I never knew how to properly lock my bike until I read a post on the forum. Mos def something that the major bike stores should be doing.

    I see that as a mini fail. The lock should be around the rear rim too. A bold theif would just cut through the rear triangle leaving them with a most of a full bike minus front wheel, frame and a few rear spokes.

    I also wonder if the bike has any security bolts to stop the fork being pinched. Hydraulic brakes in the city are immediate fail, because they are so valuable yet easy to steal.

    Its hard to show a perfectly locked valuable bike with good components, because there is so much stuff to pinch on them. You could have the bars, forks & brakes off that easy. is that a fizik saddle too?

  • the problem with those cdales is that they shouldn't even be locked. wheeling that out for a commute is a fail to being with. so far eds is the only one which is sensible.** and the cdales could both lose an entire lock by simply installing some locking skewers. efficiency fail.**
    not quite if they had locking skewers they would keep the wheels bu only one lock would be need to be removed to ride them, two locks = twice as long so less of a target no?

  • At the local art school (bournville) they have a pretty awesome locking concept.

    The bike stands have hinged part that wraps around your frame, all you need to take in is a pad lock. A similar design for street locking in capital cities would be a great idea, really hefty fucking hinged arms that go through your frame, so all you need to take in is a high quality padlock or motorcycle disc lock.

  • I see that as a mini fail. The lock should be around the rear rim too. A bold theif would just cut through the rear triangle leaving them with a full bike minus front wheel and a few rear spokes. I also wonder if the bike has any security bolts to stop the fork being pinched. Hydraulic brakes in the city are immediate fail, because they are so valuable yet easy to steal. Its hard to show a perfectly locked valuable bike with good components, because there is so much stuff to pinch on them. You could have the bars, forks & brakes off that easy. is that a fizik saddle too?

    Sorry DFP, but thats an awful lot of cutting just to get one wheel/rim. Cutting the lock, or both seatstays would take a lot of effort, and more time than would normally be spent of getting one wheel, and leaving the whole bike behind??

    I accept that disc-brakes have a dollar value associated with them, but wouldn't that be weighed against the effort to extract the things?

  • As usual, Sheldon speaks a lot of sense sheldonbrown.com/lock-strategy.html

    Personally I only carry a mini kryptonite, and secure rear wheel and frame. Pitlock on front wheel. Ultimately front wheels are much less hassle to replace than rear (tenuous point but I seem to have a lot of front wheels).

    I live in Hackney and to date nothing has been nicked off any of my bikes.

  • But the Sheldon Method has been discredited on here. It's not suitable for city security, for reasons of vandalism at least. The rear wheel is secured, using his method, but the bike isn't. If you secure wheel to frame then you're not using the Sheldon Method. Yours is the better.

  • . Cutting the lock, or both seatstays would take a lot of effort, and more time than would normally be spent of getting one wheel, and leaving the whole bike behind?? I accept that disc-brakes have a dollar value associated with them, but wouldn't that be weighed against the effort to extract the things?

    Takes about 10 secs to cut through the stays with decent hacksaw, and about 20 to get the calipers off the brakes.

  • Takes about 10 secs to cut through the stays with decent hacksaw, and about 20 to get the calipers off the brakes.

    Exactly. Frames are designed to be lightweight. The tubing is very thin especially if its butted. If I take on the mindset of a thief, I know id totally chop through that frame.

  • This is easily established. Get a bit of Al tubing and decent HS blade, and have at it. Knife thru butter.

  • This is a weird logic that is being followed. Do you really mean that thives are actually stupid people, and would prefer to ruin a bike that is worth more to sell, than just a wheel...instead of moving to a nearby bike that is badly locked? The income from the theft is normally meant for drugs, but of course, pro thieves are different.

    Surely even thieves do a quick risk assessment of what they're about to do. If there are police nearby, they walk on. If there are cyclists sitting close by, they walk on. If its a busy street, and no-one is paying attention to the bikes, they would contemplate having a go. And if faced with choosing between cutting and ruining a bike, or cutting a noddy lock and taking thge whole bike....I know which one I'd bet on.

    Unless the scenario is that a bike is locked in such a way, and on its own, that the only thing worth taking is the wheel....even if cutting the bike to bits.

  • Its not just a wheel. If you cut through the two rear seatstays you get:

    Seat & post £20 (looks like a good saddle)
    Chainset & eggbeaters £50
    Gears £15
    Fancy fork & headset £50
    Bars/stem/grips £20
    2 brakes & levers with undamaged hoses. £60
    Rear wheel & tyre minus a couple spokes. £20

    I had a bike stolen once, which the thief sold to a market stall holder. And the stall holder then sold it to a customer for £15!
    Meaning the thief went to all that effort for £5-10. Bike thieves do not knock a profit, no matter how small. And in london they all know they can get good money. Lots of flash bikes around and customers willing to pay prices equivalent to ebay.

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How To Lock Your Bike

Posted by Avatar for edscoble @edscoble

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